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Satellite technology unites Kenyans against bush fires

first_imgConservation Solutions, Dry Forests, early warning, Fires, Forests, Mapping, Monitoring, Remote Sensing, satellite data, Sensors, Technology, Wildtech The Eastern and Southern Africa Fire Information System (ESAFIS), an online application developed in Kenya, uses MODIS satellite information to detect bush fires in eastern Africa.The freely available app maps and categorizes bush fires in near-real time and shows details of each fire , including the time it was detected, its location with respect to towns and protected areas, and its relative intensity.By providing an early fire warning system, the system helps forest management authorities respond to fires in their early stages and prioritize limited resources to fire hotspots. NYERI, Kenya – It took nine hours for Margaret Wanjugu and neighbors to put out a fire that razed Gathorongai forest near her home in central Kenya, in 2016. She would not like to go through such an experience again, and for a good reason.Not only did the mother of two nearly lose her herd of goats, which were grazing in the forest, but elephants escaping the fire raided her field of potato plants, leaving her without a harvest.“No help came from forest officers working here,” Wanjugu said. “We improvised and used twigs to put out the fire.”Margaret Wanjugu leading her herd of goats home from Gathorongai forest in central Kenya, where they were grazing. The forest is prone to unexpected fire outbreaks that threaten farmers and wildlife alike. Image by David Njagi for Mongabay.Like thousands of farmers living near conservation areas in Kenya, Wanjugu lives in fear of Gathorongai forest catching fire. These communities lack an early warning system, relying on crude methods, like seeing smoke, to know of a fire outbreak.Recently, a technology developed by the Regional Center for Mapping of Resources for Development (RCMRD), a government agency based in Nairobi, has begun helping troubled Kenyans like Wanjugu with early detection of bush fires in conservation areas.RCMRD’s Eastern and Southern Africa Fire Information System (ESAFIS) web application is a free and open-source service used in all conservation and protected areas in Kenya and 10 other eastern African countries.Detecting fire intensityThe ESAFIS system senses fire outbreaks using the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer (MODIS) satellite at RCMRD, according to Byron Anangwe, the business development officer there.“When we get high temperature values at any particular point, we estimate that as a fire,” Anangwe said. “We mostly target game reserves and forests.”The system then posts this information on its website for users, including Kenya Wildlife Services (KWS) and Kenya Forest Service (KFS), to access. These institutions can then engage communities to prevent its spread, says Anangwe. Any individual with internet access can also use the service by visiting the website.Screenshot of the ESAFIS home page map with icons designating fire hotspots across eastern Africa. Image by Regional Centre for Mapping of Resources for Development (RCMRD).“We are experts at the science,” Anangwe said, “and so our role is to empower national governments, communities and the private sector to prevent fire outbreaks in national reserves and protected areas.”Anangwe says the ability of ESAFIS to show details of each fire point has helped foresters better contain bush fires. For instance, in January 2017, at the height of a prolonged drought, ESAFIS helped to detect and track fire outbreaks at the Aberdare Forest Reserve.The website opens with a map that shows recent fire hotspots detected by the system in eastern Africa, categorizing them from low to extreme intensity. At the time of filing this story, for instance, the app showed a fire outbreak around the Lake Turkana region in northwestern Kenya.Clicking on a fire icon on the map causes a pop-up to appear with the time the fire was detected, its temperature (in Kelvin, subtract 273 degrees to get Celsius!), and its location. It also identifies the nearest towns and protected areas, , in this case the South Turkana National Reserve and Nasolot National Reserve, as well as the towns of Lokichar and Kaputirr.A pop-up menu describing the fire in northwestern Kenya, near Lake Turkana, shows several characteristics of the fire obtained from MODIS satellite data. Image obtained from ESAFIS website.Anangwe says ESAFIS produces high-resolution images and has an accuracy range of about two kilometers in the areas under investigation. Users can subscribe to the ESAFIS web app and receive real-time alerts of fire outbreaks in their country or conservation area of interest as soon as the data is captured by satellite, he adds.“Everything about the system is informed by data gathered using satellite surveillance,” Anangwe said, adding that the service must work with communities for it to be effective in fighting bush fires. One limitation is the map-heavy app may overburden slower rural internet networks.Importance of early detectionWanjugu had not heard about ESAFIS. At her village, residents often rely on word of mouth to pass information about the safety of lands around Gathorongai forest, which often arrives too late to prevent the spread of fire within such marginalized communities.A wide angle view of the leeward side of the Mt. Kenya forest ecosystem. Fire outbreaks on this side of the mountain are common due to prolonged dry spells. Image by David Njagi for Mongabay.But David Mwanzia has. Mwanzia is the ecosystem conservation manager at KFS’s Nyeri Forest station in central Kenya. A no-smoking sign at the entrance to his office alerts a visitor of the danger reckless disposal of cigarette butts can pose to the fragile ecosystem there. But a fire engine truck parked at the compound assures visitors that his team of foresters are aware and ready to battle bush fires.“Fire outbreaks here are very common,” said Mwanzia. “They are very dangerous, but my team is always on alert to prevent their spread.”Mwanzia says the December to January season is the most prone to fire outbreaks there, but  ESAFIS’ early sensing is helping his teams respond more effectively.“Our staff do not go on leave at this time of the year,” Mwanzia said. “They are positioned to take immediate action when we receive a fire outbreak alert.”What causes the fires in the first place?Wanjugu said the Gathorongai forest fire ignited after a burning cigarette butt was recklessly thrown on the forest floor.Farmers burning farm waste in preparation of the planting season in central Kenya. When left unchecked such fires can spread into forests and raze acres of the natural ecosystem. Image by David Njagi for Mongabay.Stephen Korinko of the Kimana Conservancy in southern Kenya says local communities, and their slash and burn system of agriculture in particular, are to blame for most fire outbreaks. With this system, says Korinko, pastoralists set bushes on fire just before the rainy season to clear the aging vegetation so that when it rains, fresh fodder can sprout.For instance, he said, a fire that razed hundreds of acres along the wildebeest migratory corridor in the Serengeti in July 2018 was linked to the slash and burn system.Additional dangers of bush fires“The fires can spread to uncontrollable levels, especially when there are strong winds,” Korinko said. “Displaced wild animals often attack and kill people’s livestock, leading to a lot of tensions.”Wildfires also pump carbon into the atmosphere, contributing to climate change, says David Ngugi, a retired professor based in Nairobi. According to Ngugi, fires destroy trees that absorb carbon from the atmosphere and lead to the extinction of some tree species which might not be able to grow back once they are burned.“Fires also cause landscapes and ecosystems to change from forests to grasslands and shrubs,” Ngugi said.Members of the Atiriri Bururi Ma Chuka community conservation group from central Kenya showing some of the indigenous tree species that are continuously threatened by fire outbreaks. Image by David Njagi.Not all bush fires are bad, however, especially those that do not burn too long, says Mbeo Ogeya, a researcher at the Stockholm Environmental Institute (SEI). Bush fires, Ogeya says, are a natural process – nature’s way of removing dying or dead material from habitats. This process allows valuable nutrients to return to the soil, enabling regeneration and a new beginning for plants and animals.Ogeya says that ESAFIS can assist conservation work because it can distinguish between less intense, potentially useful, bush fires and extremely intense bush fires that are more harmful. By sensing fires in their early stages, ESAFIS can help resource managers respond appropriately, according to KWS spokesman Paul Gathitu.It also reduces the cost of hiring personnel to scout for fire outbreaks, adds Mwanzia, the KFS officer. At the Aberdare Forest Reserve, Mwanzia has had to hire and deploy rangers to patrol the forest and report back immediately once they spot a suspicious fire threat. The skills of these rangers could otherwise be applied to reforestation, guarding the reserve against illegal logging, or other activities. But the continued threat of fire outbreaks pressures him to allocate more resources to these patrols because fires are more destructive than logging, he says.“The government and public are giving a lot of attention to logging and neglecting bush fires,” Mwanzia said. “Yet a single fire outbreak can clear hundreds of acres of forest and can take a week to put out.”no smoking sign at the ecosystem conservation offices in Nyeri central Kenya warns a visitor that the threat of fire outbreaks is real. The office serves as a deployment base to fight off fire outbreaks Aberdare Forest Reserve. Image by David Njagi for Mongabay.He adds the Aberdare region is on high alert from December 2018 to February 2019 because this is the peak period of fire outbreaks, but that ESAFIS is making these threats easier to manage.However, not all conservation staff are aware of ESAFIS. Julius Lokinyi, a ranger at the Samburu National Reserve, still relies on scouting and patrols to ensure the safety of that ecosystem. In 2013, Lokinyi stopped being a poacher in 2013 and has dedicated himself to conservation. He says bush fires are a big challenge there and are often ignited by poachers to distract rangers from their (poachers’) trail.Over time, Lokinyi and his team of community volunteers have learned to turn this diversion into an opportunity, enabling them to tackle the twin threats of fires and poaching with precision.“When the poachers light a fire at a particular location, we know they will be active at a site which is the opposite direction to our patrol sites,” Lokinyi said. “So we deploy two teams, one to put out the fire and the other to track the criminals.”He would like to make ESAFIS available to his team, adding that: “It can make our work easier and more fun.” Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Sue Palminterilast_img read more

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Hotshots up against favored Beermen anew

first_imgGretchen Barretto’s daughter Dominique graduates magna cum laude from California college Will you be the first P16 Billion Powerball jackpot winner from the Philippines? This was how the veteran Rafi Reavis summed up the incredible stand by the Magnolia Hotshots in turning back the Rain or Shine Elasto Painters in a classic Game 7 duel to reach the Finals of the PBA Philippine Cup for the second straight season on Sunday.The Hotshots rallied from 17 points down at 39-22 midway in the third, blew a chance to win in regulation before ousteadying the Elasto Painters in the extension to prevail, 63-60, and forge another best-of-seven title showdown with heavily favored San Miguel Beer starting Wednesday.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGolden State Warriors sign Lee to multiyear contract, bring back ChrissSPORTSCoronation night?SPORTSThirdy Ravena gets‍‍‍ offers from Asia, Australian ball clubsThe 6-foot-8 Reavis, at 41 among the few still reliable senior players in the league, was a key factor as Magnolia finally survived the No. 2 team in the eliminations.Rain or Shine won the first two games of the semifinal series with Magnolia visibly spent from its quarterfinal meeting with Barangay Ginebra. The Hotshots then bounced back to win the next three games, but the Elasto Painters forced a rubber match with a masterful conquest in Game 6. LATEST STORIES Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Duterte says he will appoint Gamboa as next PNP chief Sports Briefs: April 30, 2019 Eduard Folayang gets new opponent for ONE Manila card The Witcher series prompts over 500,000 reprints of Andrzej Sapkowski’s books Phivolcs: Slim probability of Taal Volcano caldera eruption MOST READ We just put our heads down and kept fighting.ADVERTISEMENT SEA Games 2019: No surprises as Gilas Pilipinas cruises to basketball gold PLAY LIST 06:27SEA Games 2019: No surprises as Gilas Pilipinas cruises to basketball gold02:43Philippines make clean sweep in Men’s and Women’s 3×3 Basketball02:43Philippines make clean sweep in Men’s and Women’s 3×3 Basketball02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award03:05Malakanyang bilib sa Phivolcs | Chona Yu LeBron James stretches lead in NBA All-Star Game fan voting Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Reavis dominated both boards to finish with 20 rebounds while joining forces with Ian Sangalang, who came alive in the last quarter to give Magnolia a 55-52 lead going into the last two minutes.Despite the heroics of Reavis and Sangalang, experts predict easy sailing for the defending champion Beermen in their quest for a fifth straight all-Filipino title and a 26th crown overall against their sister team in the SMC franchise.After scrambling past the TNT KaTropa in their best-of-three quarterfinal series, the Beermen leaned on their deeper and more experienced bench to oust the Phoenix Pulse Fuel Masters in five games of their semifinal showdown Thursday.Phoenix, the tournament’s revelation after topping the one-round eliminations with a 9-2 win-loss record, found SMB a different foe in the semis and managed to win just the third game after dropping the first two encounters of what turned out to be a bruising series.ADVERTISEMENT Pagadian on tighter security for 100,000 expected at Sto. Niño feast View commentslast_img read more

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Going green for 2010

first_imgEnvironmental Affairs Deputy Minister Rejoice Mabudafhasi exchanging thoughts with LOC CEO Danny Jordaan at the Green Goal 2010 Programme launch. (Image: Bongani Nkosi)The recently launched Green Goal 2010 Programme is helping South Africa ensure that next year’s Fifa World Cup is an environment-friendly event.The programme was spearheaded by the country’s Department of Environmental Affairs and the 2010 Local Organising Committee (LOC) and made public on 26 November at Safa House, the LOC’s headquarters, in Johannesburg.At the launch representatives from the nine host cities, the LOC and the department signed a pledge to support Green Goal’s objectives of minimising waste, reducing harmful fuel emissions, promoting energy efficiency and conserving water.Government, especially at a local level, has committed to boost its services and community involvement to see these objectives realised.Waste and water managementTo manage waste effectively the LOC and host cities will use biodegradable packaging for takeaway food and drinks, and provide different bins to separate recyclable and non-recyclable litter at the fan parks and stadiums.Measures will also be taken to ensure there is responsible water consumption during the tournament, so South Africans won’t be affected in the future, said Rejoice Mabudafhasi, the Department of Environmental Affairs’ deputy minister.At the stadiums all urinals will be water-free, operating instead with hygienic, replaceable cartridges connected to drainpipes. Rain or run-off water will be used during cleaning.Government has promised to collect waste efficiently and regularly and ensure that potable water and electricity supply is uninterrupted at stadiums and public viewing areas.“The World Cup can … create awareness about the environment, leading to changed behavioural patterns and reduced consumption of resources such as water, electricity and fuel – as well as biodiversity protection,” Mabudafhasi said.South Africa’s Green Goal partners include Fifa, Eskom, the Central Energy Fund, local businesses and countries such as Norway, UK, Denmark and Germany.“These stakeholders are committed to a national drive to ensure the event does not leave a legacy of negative environmental impact,” Mabudafhasi added.More trees for SAEfforts are already underway to plant more trees across the country for 2010.The City of Johannesburg, which will host big 2010 games like the opening and final match at Soccer City, has undertaken to plant 200 000 trees for the tournament.“We have planted 187 000 trees, on top of the 10-million trees the city already has,” said Jenny Moodley, spokesperson of City Parks which manages Johannesburg’s cemeteries, open green areas, street trees and conserved spaces.“We have been planting trees all over,” said Mabudafhasi.Cutting down on fuel emissionsThe biggest concern about the much-anticipated World Cup is that it will increase South Africa’s carbon footprint dramatically.Environmental Affairs Minister Buyelwa Sonjica told Parliament on 25 November that a feasibility study has shown the event will generate about 2.8-million tons of carbon emissions, almost 10 times the amount produced during the German World Cup in 2006.International air travel will account for 67% of the carbon footprint, according to the study which was commissioned by the Department of Environmental Affairs and the Norwegian government.The department noted that Germany did not include air travel in its carbon footprint in 2006, and this addition for 2010 will significantly add to South Africa’s volumes.Most international visitors will have to fly to the country for the World Cup, unlike many in Germany who were able to drive in and out, LOC CEO Danny Jordaan said.“What’s different is that Germany is the centre of Europe … fans from the Netherlands and France simply drove to stadiums and returned home the same day,” he said.“We have identified a number of projects to offset our carbon footprint,” said Mabudafhasi.Sonjica recently announced that spectators will be encouraged to use bicycles to reduce fuel emissions during the tournament. She said at least three of the nine host cities will soon introduce bicycle lanes along routes leading to stadiums and other spectator sites.“The department will fund bicycle maintenance in these three host cities,” the minister said.Government is also hoping the Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) system will cut down on greenhouse gas emissions by getting more people to use public transport instead of congesting routes with private cars.Rea Vaya buses, part of Johannesburg’s BRT system, are already operational along many routes in the city and carry about 16 3000 passengers daily.There are also plans to implement the system in the host cities of Cape Town, Port Elizabeth and Pretoria.As was done during the Fifa Confederations Cup in June, other modes of public transport such as taxis and trains will be promoted in 2010 to minimise the use of cars.A great, green spectacle“We envisage that the 2010 Fifa World Cup will be a great football event and, most importantly, it will be hosted under excellent environmental stewardship,” said Mabudafhasi.“[The World Cup] will be used to raise awareness of both local and global environmental issues … and will be used to lay a foundation and set new and higher standards for greening future events in South Africa,” she added.last_img read more

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Texas ~ Property Tax: Charitable Organization Exemption Extended for Tax Preparation and Financial Services

first_imgCCH Tax Day ReportEffective January 1, 2018, the Texas property tax exemption for certain property owned by charitable organizations is extended to property used to provide tax return preparation and other financial services without regard to the beneficiaries’ ability to pay.H.B. 1345, Laws 2017, effective as notedlast_img

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