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Squash On Tap In Southampton Village

first_imgForgive an onlooker who thought the “Summer Squash” on the agenda was going to be a discussion about the creamy soup served at some of the village’s finest restaurants during the high season.Actually, professional squash is a booming sport, akin to tennis, and played worldwide. And Sayed Selim wants to bring it to Southampton Village this summer.“I have a dream to make great events and bring business,” he told the Southampton Village Board on February 25. Spectators would come to see world-class players, tournaments would be held, and courts would be set up. Hopefully, he said, visitors “would do a little shopping and eat at restaurants.” Perhaps dining on summer squash soup.A glass-enclosed court would be set up at Dozier Park to house the matches, Selim said. Among the highlights planned for the summer would be a junior tournament, a senior tournament, and exhibition matches.“I’ve gotten to know him and I invited him to speak. They are offering to pay for everything and it’s something offered for children, and I like that idea,” Mayor Jesse Warren said.Selim has the creds. An Egyptian-born former professional squash player, he once coached the Egyptian National women’s team, and more recently stars like Cameron Munn, Ryan Murray, Olivia Robinson, and Morgan Huberman, when they were juniors.Warren asked if town board approval would be needed. Board members had questions as well. Village board member Richard Yastrzemski asked about the duration of the squash events. “Other people use the park. How many would utilize the courts?” he asked. Yastrzemski said the park “also gets marshy in spots” and is hard to traverse.Stephanie Janus, an associate of Selim, said she would compile more information and address all of the board members’ concerns.A week earlier the village board voted 4-0 — Yastrzemski was absent — to hire Brian Egan of Egan and Golden LLP to serve as village attorney. He graduated on the dean’s list from St. John’s University School of Law with a Juris Doctor degree in 1999. He has served as village attorney for Mastic, Patchogue, and Port Jefferson, and hails from Patchogue.Warren ruffled some feathers when he engineered the departure of Wayne Bruyn and Bo Robinson, the former Southampton Village attorneys, shortly into his first term. Mark Parash and Kimberly Allan balked. Egan has experience as a village mayor and also experience with the topic of sewer systems. Warren said he found it “unusual” the board initially blocked Egan’s hire.This time around, differences were apparently hashed out in executive session and the vote to hire Egan passed 4-0. (Yastrzemski was absent).Egan will earn $3000 a month to attend two meetings, draft resolutions and the like, and an additional $225 an hour for other legal assistance.The board’s next meeting is Thursday, March 12, at Village Hall.rmurphy@indyeastend.com Sharelast_img read more

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Red ink for Eidesvik

first_imgNorwegian supply, subsea and seismic shipping company, Eidesvik Offshore, has posted a fourth-quarter 2015 net loss despite rise in revenues. The shipping company’s net loss was NOK 202,3 million in the fourth quarter of 2015, compared to NOK 252,9 million in 4Q 2014.For the fourth quarter of 2015, Eidesvik posted revenues of NOK 343,2 million, versus revenues of NOK 259,4 million in the same period of 2014.The company recognized a gain of $92,8 million on sale of two vessels, the cable-lay vessel European Supporter and seismic vessel Viking II, both delivered to the client in October 2015.Based on the weak outlook to revenues in the supply segment, Eidesvik decided to recognize an impairment charge of NOK 290 million for five vessels. The assessment is based on value in use of the vessels.In order to position itself for difficult market conditions Eidesvik entered into new contracts for its vessel; sold the European Supporter and Viking II with debt-reduction of $12 million and net cash effect of $17 million; renegotiated all loan agreements which had maturity in 2016, -17, -18 and -19; entered into agreement with sea-employees for working hours reduction; carried out general reduction of operating expenses through lay-up and flag-change; reduced administration expenses; and negotiated new agreements with major suppliers.According to the company, the market conditions have deteriorated further through 4th quarter 2015, therefore Eidesvik said it expected additional cuts in the the oil companies’ investments, which would reduce the activity levels going forward.Offshore Energy Today Stafflast_img read more

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City firms failing to support solicitors who want to become judges

first_imgConcern is mounting over City firms’ failure to support solicitors who want to become judges, Law Society chief executive Des Hudson was expected to tell the Law Society Council this week. In his monthly report, Hudson also suggests that a ‘similar message’ might emerge from a delayed report from the lord chancellor’s panel on judicial diversity. Baroness Usha Prashar (pictured), chair of the Judicial Appointments Commission, has agreed to address the Law Society’s City Equality and Diversity Forum on the issue in February. Prashar said it will be an ‘excellent opportunity to promote judicial appointments to the larger firms.’ Many City law firms are perceived to be unwilling to sacrifice their senior lawyers’ billable hours and allow them to sit for three weeks a year as part-time judges, a requirement to qualify for a full-time judicial post. Law Society president Robert Heslett said: ‘The Law Society and JAC are working to improve understanding across the solicitors profession of the opportunities for judicial appointments, and to help employers support their solicitors who are interested in becoming a judge. ‘We see fewer applicants from larger firms than you might expect would be proportionate, but we are working to increase applications from suitably qualified solicitors in every part of the profession.’ The lord chancellor’s panel on judicial diversity, set up in April and chaired by Baroness Julia Neuberger, was due to report in November. As part of its work to identify the barriers people face when applying for judicial posts, the panel is looking into whether support provided to prospective and new entrants to the judiciary is ‘adequate,’ among other things. However, a Ministry of Justice spokesperson said this week that discussions with a ‘significant number’ of stakeholders have taken longer than expected, and the final report will be published in early 2010. ‘The panel is aware of the issue regarding solicitors but we will wait until the findings of our report are published before commenting,’ the spokesman said. Research published in December 2008 by Dame Hazel Genn, professor of socio-legal studies at University College London, found that senior solicitors at magic circle law firms were reluctant to accept low judicial salaries, and had only a vague understanding of eligibility criteria and the selection process for judicial posts.last_img read more

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Not just any old wood

first_imgTo continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe now for unlimited access Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our communitylast_img read more

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Welcome

first_imgSubscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe now for unlimited accesslast_img read more

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Faymonville introduces agricultural lowbed

first_imgBased on Faymonville’s MegaMAX range, the trailer is hydraulically adaptable. When retracted it is 1.6 m wide and it can be extended up to 3.65 m. Machines with a deadweight of up to 33 tonnes can be loaded.French customer Translyre has already used the trailer to transported a combine harvester. The combine, which measured 3.5 m wide, was transported on the telescopically extendable lowbed without removing the crawler drive.www.faymonville.comlast_img

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Care letters make clients ‘feel stupid’, says watchdog

first_imgSolicitors have been urged to include key information about costs and estimated time scales in client care letters as well as shorten them and use ‘plain English’ to avoid making clients ‘feel stupid’.Research into Client Care Letters, published by the Legal Services Consumer Panel today, makes several recommendations to ensure better communication with clients. The Law Society said that solicitors are already under a professional obligation to provide clear information. Citing feedback from respondents, the consumer panel said its research shows that the letters do not meet the needs of clients with low literacy levels and for whom English is a second language. It cites one as saying that the letters appear to imply ‘they’re [solicitors] trying to make you feel thick.’Another said: ’It’s all about money. I’m not sure there’s much empathy there or that they’ve got your best interests at heart.’The research was carried out by Optimisa on behalf of the consumer panel and included group and face-to-face interviews with people who had recently taken legal advice or who planned to.It was carried out behalf of regulators including the Bar Standards Board and Solicitors Regulation Authority. According to the consumer panel, it will be up to the regulators to take account of these principles to inform their work.Elisabeth Davies (pictured), chair of the panel, said: ‘Client care letters are mostly ineffective at conveying the information consumers prioritise, such as cost, timescales, and basic client-relation contact details.‘Worryingly, the research also shows that client care letters do not meet the needs of vulnerable consumers. There is an urgent need for approved regulators to rise to the challenge of supporting providers to deliver improved communication to consumers.’But Robert Bourns, president of the Law Society, said solicitors are already more likely than other legal advisers to provide information on costs and indicate how long their work would take.‘Solicitors recognise the importance of ensuring clients have the clearest possible information and solicitors have a professional obligation to provide that information,’ he said.‘The Law Society offers support in this area for our members in its Client Care Information Practice Note, which recommends creating short letters, providing clear information about cost (both at the start of the retainer and throughout), using plain English and highlighting key information. We will continue to develop our support in this important area so that solicitors can provide ever more useful and accessible information to their clients, particularly vulnerable clients.’last_img read more

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Josh Turner Union Chapel, London live review

first_imgSouth Carolina-born Country singer-songwriter Josh Turner released his debut album Long Black Train in 2003. 16 years on from the release of that record and Turner has finally made a trip to the UK to perform a series of headline shows and headline Sunday night at The Long Road. It’s amazing to think that someone with the success that Turner has enjoyed, has never made the trip to the UK especially given the rise in popularity for Country music the past few years. With a recently expanded edition of his 2018 album I Serve a Savior having just been released in the UK, Turner performed his first ever UK show at London’s Union Chapel last night.Given that his current album is a collection of faith-based songs, it seemed fitting that Turner was headlining at Union Chapel. Still a church on the weekend, the venue has started to attract many Country stars thanks to its unique feel and fantastic acoustics. For Turner’s debut show, he performed an acoustic set back by three of his band (those going to The Long Road this weekend will get the full band treatment). Opening his set with fan favourite single Why Don’t We Just Dance, Turner received a rapturous reception including one woman who shouted out frequently throughout the show.Turner’s deep tone sounded fantastic live. He hit notes so low that It was genuinely spine-tingling at times. Deep South, the title track of his 2017 album really showcase the depth of his voice as he sang about where was from. The audience lapped it up and Turner, with a big smile across his face, clearly was aware that he had his fans in the palm of his hand. The first third of the set mainly concentrated on the hits with cuts such Everything is Fine and Time is Love keeping the crowd engaged and hungry for more. The punchy Firecracker kept the tempo high and proved to be a real crowd pleaser.The remainder of the set switched between selections of I Serve a Savior and more of Turner’s enviable back catalogue of hits. I was nervous as to how faith-based songs would go down with an audience. Not every artist can pull it off – over the years we’ve seen Carrie win UK fans over with Jesus Take the Wheel and Reba fall flat during her headline set at C2C with selections from her album Sing It Now – but Turner managed. UK fans tend not to go in for the religious focused songs but they lapped up what Turner had to offer.A lively rendition of Hank Williams’ I Saw the Light was a hit as was a fast-paced uptempo version of Swing Low Sweet Chariot. Loretta Lynn’s I Pray My Way Out of Trouble, a song Turner told the audience he hadn’t really been playing, was a nice addition to the night’s set list. Me and God and I Serve a Savior got the biggest reactions with the former having featured on Turner’s Your Man album in 2006 before being recorded live for I Serve a Savior.Entering the final stretch of his set Turner performed the catchy All Over Me and the powerful and autobiographical Long Black Train. He brought the night to a close with Your Man, easily one of his signature tunes and a playful way to end a fantastic night.Turner’s first UK show was an undeniable success. The set list hit most of the right notes with the audience and Turner exuded charisma in between songs joking with the audience and occasionally veering off on an amusing tangent. Seeing Turner live in the UK has been a very long time coming but it was most definitely worth the wait. Given the reception he had last night, and that he’s got more performances to come this week, Turner had better be already planning his next trip to the UK. I can’t wait.<span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span>Set list: 1. Why Don’t We Just Dance 2. Deep South 3. Everything is Fine 4. Time is Love 5. Firecracker 6. Me and God 7. I Saw the Light (Hank Williams cover) 8. Swing Low Sweet Chariot 9. Hometown Girl 10. Would You Go With Me 11. I Pray My Way Out of Trouble (Loretta Lynn cover) 12. I Serve a Savior 13. All Over Me 14. Long Black Train 15. Your Man Performance date: 5th September 2019last_img read more

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Southern Zimbabwe goes without water due to drought

first_imgZimbabwe to sell some of its wildlife as drought worsens Zimbabwe capital considers water rationing A woman carries water from an unprotected source in Mabvuku, a highly-populated suburb in Harare, Zimbabwe, September 3, 2019. Picture taken September 3, 2019. REUTERS/Philimon Bulawayo Families in the southern Zimbabwean city of Bulawayo are going up to four days without running water as drought dries the dams the city depends on, city council officials said.In this photo taken on Sunday, Oct. 27, 2019, a sun baked pool that used to be a perennial water supply is seen in Mana Pools National Park, Zimbabwe./AP The city has since late November imposed 96-hour dry periods for residential water customers, though industrial and business users have continued to receive service, according to the Bulawayo City Council.An extended drought has reduced supplies of stored water, forcing the city to decommission two of its major supply dams, said Nesisa Mpofu, a spokeswoman for the council.Shortages of hydropower-produced electricity also have affected the city’s ability to pump water from the dams, she said.“Out of six dams, Bulawayo now remains with four water sources,” she said.The four-day water outages – up from three days previously – have spurred widespread local efforts to store more water and to find alternative sources.Arnold Batirai, a councillor for Nketa, a suburb of Bulawayo, said many residents in his area had access to alternative water sources such as wells or water supply trucks provided by the council.But he acknowledged that not all borehole wells were still functioning, while shortages of fuel had affected water truck deliveries in some areas.Relatedcenter_img Drought forces Mozambique capital to ration waterlast_img read more

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Wildlife farming proposed for consideration in Dominica

first_img Sharing is caring! LocalNews Wildlife farming proposed for consideration in Dominica by: Dominica Vibes News – October 26, 2015 305 Views   2 comments Share Sharecenter_img Share Tweet A Red-rumped Agouti. Image via: focusonnature.comWildlife farming is one possibility that could be looked at to restock Dominica’s forest of its wild animals that are usually hunted for their meat.That’s according to the Director of Forestry Minchinton Burton who was speaking at a stakeholder’s consultation at the Fisheries Complex on Forest-based livelihoods on Friday 23 October 2015.There is only a three month period where hunters can remove animals from the wild, which is approved by the Forestry, Wildlife and Parks Division.However, Burton said, the three month provision is being reviewed as there is a market for wild meat.“We recognize the fact that a number of restaurants and a number of service providers say they would like to have some wild meat during the year,” Burton said. “So we would have to look at how we can get into some wild life farming. This will release the pressure in the wild and it will allow people to get into some agouti and one or two species where they can rear them,” Burton said.But, Permanent Secretary in the Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries, Harold Guiste told the consultation that Dominica’s wildlife has suffered tremendously as some habitats have been destroyed and others severely damaged.“There is still quite a bit of natural resource that is still in tack. In terms of wildlife, maybe we can engage in some program for restocking of the forest. Rearing agouti and rearing others whilst domesticating them somehow is a good thing”.Guiste added that it would be a good exercise to have a program where these animals could be bred and restocked into the wild.He indicated that a wildlife farming program will give more liberty to hunters to hunt forest animals.last_img read more

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