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Top stories Detecting fake images Earths fastest animals and why dogs are

first_img By Giorgia GuglielmiJul. 21, 2017 , 3:15 PM Email Why midsized animals are the fastest on EarthAn elephant should run faster than a horse—at least in theory. That’s because big creatures have more of the type of muscle cells used for acceleration. Yet midsized animals are the fastest on Earth, a trend that researchers have long struggled to explain. Now, an analysis of nearly 500 species ranging from fruit flies to whales has an answer: The muscle cells in big animals run out of fuel before the creatures can reach their theoretical maximum speed. The work may also help scientists come up with estimates for the running speeds of certain dinosaurs.Surprise! The proton is lighter than we thought Top stories: Detecting fake images, Earth’s fastest animals, and why dogs are so friendly Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! 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Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) (Left to right): carloscastilla/iStockphoto; OGphoto/iStockphoto; KENNETH GEIGER/National Geographic Creative You can’t weigh the universe’s smallest particles on a bathroom scale. But in a clever new experiment, physicists have found that one such particle—the proton—is lighter than previously thought. The researchers found its mass to be 1.007276466583 atomic mass units. That’s roughly 30 billionths of a percent lower than the average value from past experiments—a seemingly tiny difference that is actually significant by three standard deviations.Salk Institute under fire for ‘smear’ on women suing it for discriminationAlleging decades of gender discrimination, two senior female scientists last week sued the Salk Institute for Biological Studies, sparking a public relations debacle that has engulfed the venerable institution and could threaten its appeal to donors and new researchers. Leaders of the San Diego, California, research center have strenuously denied the allegations made by biologists Vicki Lundblad and Katherine Jones, and publicly questioned their productivity and the quality of their scientific work.What makes dogs so friendly? Study finds genetic link to super-outgoing peopleIt’s one of the biggest perks of being a dog owner: Your pooch is thrilled when you come home, wagging its tail, wiggling its body, and licking you with its tongue. Now, scientists say they have pinned down the genetic basis of this affection. Using clues from humans with a genetic disorder that makes them unusually friendly, the team found variations in several genes that make dogs more affable than wolves and some dogs friendlier than others.Senate budgetmakers move to keep ARPA-E, bump up DOE science spendingU.S. Senate budgetmakers are headed to a showdown with their counterparts in the House of Representatives over the Department of Energy’s Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E), which aims to quickly turn the best ideas from basic research into fledging energy technologies. A Senate appropriations subcommittee voted this week to give ARPA-E an 8% increase, to $330 million, in the 2018 fiscal year that begins 1 October. In contrast, a House spending panel voted last week to eliminate the young agency, which got its start in 2009.Can you tell whether this photo has been manipulated?If you were fooled by the recent photo of U.S. President Donald Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin having an intense discussion at the G20 summit, don’t feel bad. In a recent study people were only able to spot faked images 60% of the time. And almost half of the time they were not able to tell where an image had been altered, cognitive science researchers report this week.last_img

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