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Bernie Sanders calls Senate Obamacare replacement ‘worse than expected’

first_imgVermont Business Magaziine US Senator Bernie Sanders (I-Vermont) issued the following statement and video Thursday after Senate Republicans released a draft of their health care bill: “For weeks, Republicans have been drafting their ‘health care’ bill in secret, refusing to hold hearings or public debate. Now we know why. The bill Republicans announced today is even worse than expected and by far the most harmful piece of legislation I have seen in my lifetime. This bill has nothing to do with health care. It has everything to do with an enormous transfer of wealth from working people to the richest Americans.“Republicans want to throw millions of Americans off of health insurance – including thousands of Vermonters – slash Medicaid, defund Planned Parenthood and substantially increase premiums on older Americans. Meanwhile, their bill would provide over $200 billion in tax breaks to the top 2 percent and hundreds of billions more to the big drug and insurance companies that are ripping off the American people.“Our job now is to rally millions of Americans against this disastrous bill to make sure that it does not pass the Senate. Instead of throwing tens of millions of Americans off of health insurance, we must guarantee health care as a right to every American.”Source: WASHINGTON, June 22, 2017 – Sen. Bernie Sanderslast_img read more

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New study highlights important links between depressive symptoms, Black identity and marital satisfaction in African-American couples

first_imgShare on Twitter Share on Facebook LinkedIn Share New research in the Journal of Family Psychology sheds light on how mental health affects marital satisfaction among Black couples over time. The study also provides evidence that racial identity moderates the relationship between depressive symptoms and marital satisfaction.Why were the study’s authors interested in this topic?“I am motivated by the desire to enhance romantic functioning among Black couples and optimize the mental health of individuals within Black families,” explained study author August Jenkins, a doctoral candidate at Pennsylvania State University and NRSA F31 Predoctoral Diversity Fellow.center_img “Although research has established the importance of the connections between relationship quality and mental health, little of this work has explored how relationship quality and mental health are connected among Black Americans.”“Further, I also recognize that Black people experience a unique racialized context in America that provides both sources of stress and resilience. Therefore, to accurately capture the linkages between relationship quality and mental health among Black couples across time we have to account for this context,” Jenkins said.“Discrimination can have profound effects on mental health and the ability to develop and maintain positive relationships. Similarly, racial identity can provide a source of encouragement or self-esteem that promotes psychological adjustment and relationship adjustment.”For their study, the researchers examined longitudinal data from 168 heterosexual Black couples. The information — which included measures of depressive symptoms, marital satisfaction, discrimination, and Black identity — was collected during in-home visits between 2002 and 2004.The researchers found that spouses’ depressive symptoms predicted their own and their spouses’ marital satisfaction one year later. The marital satisfaction of wives was also found to be a stronger predictor of the marital satisfaction of husbands than vice versa.In addition, Jenkins and her colleagues found evidence that sociocultural factors played a role. Wives’ depressive symptoms predicted declines in husbands’ marital satisfaction — but only when wives reported that their Black identity was relatively more central to their overall self-concept. The depressive symptoms of wives with a weaker sense of Black identity were not associated with husbands’ satisfaction.However, husbands tended to be the most satisfied when their wives had relatively fewer depressive symptoms and also valued their Black identity more. This could indicate that women with a stronger Black identity are more inclined (compared to those with a weaker identity) to provide for their spouse’s needs when healthy, but also more inclined to disengage when less healthy, the researchers said.What should the average person take away from the study?“I think there are four important take-home points from the study. First, this study demonstrates that the links between relationship quality and mental health are relevant for Black couples. This is important because a better understanding of these linkages can undergird translational efforts, either via prevention programs or policy developments, that leverage these connections to simultaneously promote greater relationship functioning and mental health for Black individuals and their families,” Jenkins told PsyPost.“Second, the study highlights the linkages between relationship quality and mental health within individuals’ own experiences, but also between romantic partners. These latter, cross-partner links have implications for Black family functioning in showing that the distress of one member in the couple can impact their partner and most importantly this effect may be amplified in the contexts of external stressors like discrimination.”“Third, our findings showed more generally that the links between relationship quality and mental health are best understood within a sociocultural context. That is, both experiences of discrimination and racial identity altered the strength of the links between marital satisfaction and depressive symptoms,” Jenkins said.“Fourth, the effect of discrimination and racial identity on relationship quality and mental health was different for women and men. When individuals experienced more discrimination, spouses’ marital satisfaction was related to better mental health for men but poorer mental health for women, and the combination of wives’ positive psychological functioning and strong racial identity had positive implication for Black men’s marital experiences, but these effects were not evident for women.”“Both these findings speak to what has been termed the ‘intersectionality’ of race and gender; they also suggest a unique manifestation of burden for Black women,” Jenkins explained.Are there any major caveats? What questions still need to be addressed?“It is important to remember that this study was just the first step to understanding these processes. More research is necessary to see if these findings can be replicated with larger and more diverse samples to confirm our results,” Jenkins said.“I think current national events underscore the relevance and necessity of continuing to research topics related to Black mental health and family functioning. Completing and conducting scientifically sound, socially responsible research is not an easy task, but it is incredibly important,” she added.“Such labor produces rigorous and germane scholarship, which is one of the multiple tools that are useful in exposing and dismantling the structures of racism and advancing the position of Black people in this country.”The study, “Prospective Associations between Depressive Symptoms and Marital Satisfaction in Black Couples“, was authored by August I. C. Jenkins, Steffany J. Fredman, Yunying Le, Xiaoran Sun, Timothy R. Brick, Olivenne D. Skinner and Susan M. McHale.(Image by Free-Photos from Pixabay) Email Pinterestlast_img read more

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Why not let the taxman pay for your Christmas?

first_imgJust imagine having all your Christmas shopping paid for. What’s even better wouldn’t it be great that the Taxman was the person who paid for it!TheTaxClinic.ie is the only tax practice in Donegal that specialises in claiming back your tax. Michael Coll from The Tax Clinic says “you can still claim back any overpaid tax for the years 2014, 2015, 2016 & 2017 but you must be quick as you will be unable to claim any overpaid tax from the year 2014 after the 31st of December 2018”.With millions of euro still going unclaimed each year it is just crazy that people are not checking if they are owed a tax refund he said.The Tax Clinic offer a NO Refund No Fee policy and check the last 4 years to see if there was any reliefs and tax credits due that were not claimed.As Chartered Tax Advisers we have the experience and knowledge to maximise any refund due. Just log onto to our website https://thetaxclinic.ie/tax-refunds/and complete the form and either email or post us the form so we can get to work.Letterkenny Office – 074 9160550Killybegs Office – 074 9732055Why not let the taxman pay for your Christmas? was last modified: November 22nd, 2018 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:CHristmasdonegalRefundThe Tax Cliniclast_img read more

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Photo of the Week: Plymouth Community Christmas Carol Sing-Along

first_imgThough it was a gray afternoon, the clouds didn’t chase away families and friends from joining the 2015 Plymouth Community Christmas Carol Sing-Along today in downtown Plymouth, Michigan at Kellogg Park.Led by Dr. Jerry Smith, the music director at my church, First Presbyterian Church of Plymouth, I joined dozens of people for a late afternoon sing-along of of holiday carols in the almost forty-degree weather. The park was filled with members of our congregation, families with young children in strollers, and older couples singing O Come All Ye Faithful, Here We Come A-Caroling, Go Tell It On The Mountain, and other Christmas carols along with the wonderful Salvation Army band. I love sing-alongs and wish there were more throughout the year. It seems the only time families join together for sing-alongs is at church, school, or during the Christmas season. Downtown Detroit has a community sing-along at Noel Night every year, led by the Salvation Army, but I haven’t heard of other community sing-alongs in the metro Detroit area. Do you have a community sing-along in your town? Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Like this:Like Loading…RelatedPhoto of the Week: Celebrating the Holidays at Kellogg ParkWhat a wonderful afternoon for the Community Carol Sing-Along today in downtown Plymouth, Michigan at Kellogg Park. Led by Dr. Jerry Smith, the music director at my church, I joined several hundred people from the community for an afternoon of joyous carol singing. Downtown Plymouth was filled with the sounds…In “Web design & development links”A Look Back at 2014With my commitment to blog daily in 2014, I’ve written about websites, user experience, WordPress, accessibility, local web worker events, email marketing, and technology this year. And I’ve been thankful to all of you for reading along. I appreciate all your comments, tips, and suggestions. Keep ’em coming! Here’s a…In “End of year”Photo of the Week: Plymouth Ice Festival 2015With wind chills bringing temperatures to the -10 to -20 degrees (Farenheit) range, it had to be one of the coldest years for the Plymouth Ice Festival this weekend in Plymouth, Michigan. Held the first weekend of January, the Plymouth Ice Festival brings thousands of people to downtown Plymouth to…In “Web design & development links”last_img read more

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Going green for 2010

first_imgEnvironmental Affairs Deputy Minister Rejoice Mabudafhasi exchanging thoughts with LOC CEO Danny Jordaan at the Green Goal 2010 Programme launch. (Image: Bongani Nkosi)The recently launched Green Goal 2010 Programme is helping South Africa ensure that next year’s Fifa World Cup is an environment-friendly event.The programme was spearheaded by the country’s Department of Environmental Affairs and the 2010 Local Organising Committee (LOC) and made public on 26 November at Safa House, the LOC’s headquarters, in Johannesburg.At the launch representatives from the nine host cities, the LOC and the department signed a pledge to support Green Goal’s objectives of minimising waste, reducing harmful fuel emissions, promoting energy efficiency and conserving water.Government, especially at a local level, has committed to boost its services and community involvement to see these objectives realised.Waste and water managementTo manage waste effectively the LOC and host cities will use biodegradable packaging for takeaway food and drinks, and provide different bins to separate recyclable and non-recyclable litter at the fan parks and stadiums.Measures will also be taken to ensure there is responsible water consumption during the tournament, so South Africans won’t be affected in the future, said Rejoice Mabudafhasi, the Department of Environmental Affairs’ deputy minister.At the stadiums all urinals will be water-free, operating instead with hygienic, replaceable cartridges connected to drainpipes. Rain or run-off water will be used during cleaning.Government has promised to collect waste efficiently and regularly and ensure that potable water and electricity supply is uninterrupted at stadiums and public viewing areas.“The World Cup can … create awareness about the environment, leading to changed behavioural patterns and reduced consumption of resources such as water, electricity and fuel – as well as biodiversity protection,” Mabudafhasi said.South Africa’s Green Goal partners include Fifa, Eskom, the Central Energy Fund, local businesses and countries such as Norway, UK, Denmark and Germany.“These stakeholders are committed to a national drive to ensure the event does not leave a legacy of negative environmental impact,” Mabudafhasi added.More trees for SAEfforts are already underway to plant more trees across the country for 2010.The City of Johannesburg, which will host big 2010 games like the opening and final match at Soccer City, has undertaken to plant 200 000 trees for the tournament.“We have planted 187 000 trees, on top of the 10-million trees the city already has,” said Jenny Moodley, spokesperson of City Parks which manages Johannesburg’s cemeteries, open green areas, street trees and conserved spaces.“We have been planting trees all over,” said Mabudafhasi.Cutting down on fuel emissionsThe biggest concern about the much-anticipated World Cup is that it will increase South Africa’s carbon footprint dramatically.Environmental Affairs Minister Buyelwa Sonjica told Parliament on 25 November that a feasibility study has shown the event will generate about 2.8-million tons of carbon emissions, almost 10 times the amount produced during the German World Cup in 2006.International air travel will account for 67% of the carbon footprint, according to the study which was commissioned by the Department of Environmental Affairs and the Norwegian government.The department noted that Germany did not include air travel in its carbon footprint in 2006, and this addition for 2010 will significantly add to South Africa’s volumes.Most international visitors will have to fly to the country for the World Cup, unlike many in Germany who were able to drive in and out, LOC CEO Danny Jordaan said.“What’s different is that Germany is the centre of Europe … fans from the Netherlands and France simply drove to stadiums and returned home the same day,” he said.“We have identified a number of projects to offset our carbon footprint,” said Mabudafhasi.Sonjica recently announced that spectators will be encouraged to use bicycles to reduce fuel emissions during the tournament. She said at least three of the nine host cities will soon introduce bicycle lanes along routes leading to stadiums and other spectator sites.“The department will fund bicycle maintenance in these three host cities,” the minister said.Government is also hoping the Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) system will cut down on greenhouse gas emissions by getting more people to use public transport instead of congesting routes with private cars.Rea Vaya buses, part of Johannesburg’s BRT system, are already operational along many routes in the city and carry about 16 3000 passengers daily.There are also plans to implement the system in the host cities of Cape Town, Port Elizabeth and Pretoria.As was done during the Fifa Confederations Cup in June, other modes of public transport such as taxis and trains will be promoted in 2010 to minimise the use of cars.A great, green spectacle“We envisage that the 2010 Fifa World Cup will be a great football event and, most importantly, it will be hosted under excellent environmental stewardship,” said Mabudafhasi.“[The World Cup] will be used to raise awareness of both local and global environmental issues … and will be used to lay a foundation and set new and higher standards for greening future events in South Africa,” she added.last_img read more

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MusicWorks changes children’s lives through music

first_imgMusicWorks runs an Early Childhood Development Programme. (Images: MusicWorks)It was over a decade ago that children in the impoverished Heideveld community were so desperate to join in the Music Therapy Community Clinic’s programme being held at their school that they were knocking on the doors and windows, pleading to be let in.This story is recounted by Sunelle Fouché, who, along with Kerryn Torrance, founded non-governmental organisation (NGO) MusicWorks, which aims to heal children traumatised by violence, poverty and neglect through music therapy. Provide a feeling of belonging, an avenue for creativity and instilling a positive sense of self, music therapy offers a powerful and versatile intervention for children in impoverished communities afflicted by substance abuse and crime.The Safe Schools committee in Heideveld (an education department initiative) approached Torrance in 2002 to do music therapy groups with children who had been exposed to violence. Later that year Fouché joined Torrance, and it became clear that music therapy could be a valuable intervention for children growing up in violent communities.Soon they were receiving positive feedback from teachers so when the funding from the Education Department ended, the two decided to continue with their work and to source funding elsewhere. This lead to the formation of the Music Therapy Community Clinic, which in 2014 became MusicWorks.Fouché and Torrance continued to offer group and individual music therapy sessions to children referred to them by teachers in the Heideveld community.“Soon children at the school were knocking on the doors and windows of the therapy room as the music was happening, pleading to be allowed to join in. Contrary to the stigma that often surrounds ‘therapy’, these children were desperate to be allowed to be part of the music-making,” she says.“This lead to the development of the Music for Life programme which started off with a choir and drumming circles. Today, this programme continues to offer after-school music activities where children not only learn a musical skill, but where they can also access a safe space, experience a sense of belonging, and explore an identity that is linked to enjoyment, co-creating, and cohesion.“As the work developed we started receiving invitations from other community-based organisations to implement our programmes with the children in their care. The organisation grew from a need within communities and we started employing music therapists, community musicians and administrative staff in order to develop and implement the programmes.“Rather than having a fixed premises, programmes are run on the premises of community-based organisations (schools, places of safety, day-care centres, hospitals, palliative-care centres, child and youth care facilities) who have invited us. We adjust our programmes to serve the specific needs of the children in each of our partner organisations.”MUSICWORKS PROGRAMMESMUSIC THERAPYThe Music Therapy Programme offers small group and individual music therapy sessions to children who have experienced trauma that affects their social and emotional development. This includes exposure to violence at home or in the community, and neglect or abandonment and the effects of illness such as HIV and Aids. It affects their ability to regulate and control their emotions as well as how they relate to others.Fouché says, “Many of the referrals that come our way are children acting out and being aggressive. Children imitate the behaviour they see around them and so the cycle of violence is perpetuated. When making music together, group members listen to each other’s musical contributions, they have to wait their turn, and they take turns in being the leader and at other times, follow. Within a safe and trusting space, and while making music and being creative, children have the opportunity to explore different ways of relating to their peers – both musically and socially.“Furthermore, making music allows for opportunities to express a range of emotions in a non-verbal way. This … allows for children to express the emotion in a space and musical structure that is safely contained by the music therapist. More importantly, as sessions progress, conversations about difficult emotions allow children to develop a vocabulary which could enable them to express themselves more clearly as well as begin to assert a sense of control over their emotional life.”Children are referred by teachers, nurses, doctors, and social workers from schools, hospitals, paediatric palliative care settings, places of safety, and child and youth care facilities.Music therapists run weekly group or individual music therapy sessions with the children for between 10 and 20 weeks (sometimes even longer). The therapeutic goals are determined by the needs of each child.For the children in palliative care, music therapy serves a very different purpose. Many of the children referred for music therapy have a range of disabilities. The effects of illness and neglect have rendered them unable to communicate and engage with the world around them. Here music is used as a way of non-verbal communication.Fouché talks about six-year-old Elijah* who suffers from acute and debilitating cerebral palsy, and who was also severely neglected and malnourished. The music therapist saw he was always lying in his bed, quiet and isolated from the world. As music therapy sessions progressed Elijah started making vocal sounds related to what the therapist was singing and they began to interact musically. In one of the sessions, Elijah sang in a deeply connected manner, to the surprise and delight of staff members. Music allowed others to engage with Elijah, as nurses started using singing and vocal games as a way of communicating with him.MUSIC FOR LIFEThe Music for Life programme provides various after-school music activities, such as drumming and marimba bands, gumboot dancing and choirs to young people living in Heideveld, Lavender Hill and Nyanga in the Western Cape. Weekly rehearsals are led by community musicians and songs from various cultures are incorporated. The children’s input is encouraged and valued, and community music events and annual concerts are staged. The music groups provide safe spaces where children are able to experience a sense of belonging and connection.The programme also focuses on training young people from the communities to run music groups with younger children. Young people with both musical ability and leadership potential are identified, mentored and taught how to facilitate music groups that not only transfer musical skills, but also enhance the children’s self-esteem.“We have been inspired by the enthusiasm with which the young leaders have taken on this task,” Fouché says. “They have grown up in the communities and understand the challenges that the children face, and they are dedicated to their goal of having a positive impact on the social fabric of their communities.“Through the staging of music events and annual concerts, parents and other community members are able to witness and celebrate their children. It is through the sharing of music that the community draws together and creates a powerful alternative to the hopelessness that often permeates under-resourced communities.“The programme allows children who might not otherwise have had the opportunity to learn to play a musical instrument and helps them to develop socially and emotionally, while using music as a vehicle to bring about social change.”EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENTThe Early Childhood Development Programme offers training to teachers and childcare workers on how to use music in their classroom based on the VIP principle. Using this principle, the children (aged between two and six) are valued as Very Important People (VIPs) who need to be seen, heard and acknowledged.The programme also offers Creative Music Facilitation training to teachers, carers, social workers, community workers or musicians, and equips them with the tools to conduct creative music-making sessions with children in their care. “Empowering carers with creative resources and music-making facilitates the critical early development of the child, enhancing and enriching the child’s emotional and social development,” she says.“From a health perspective, science – specifically the field of neurobiology – is telling us that the experience of a traumatic event (and in the communities we work, ongoing trauma) changes the structures of the brain which in turn effects how children are able to function in the world on an emotional, social, psychological level.“From a psycho-social perspective research… children growing up in violent communities are more likely to become perpetrators of violence or remain victims later in life. Families and schools in these communities are under pressure and are not able to provide the psycho-social support the children so desperately need.Music therapy is used to heal traumatised children“A recent study done by University of Western Cape (An Exploration into the Impact of Exposure to Community Violence and Hope on Children’s Perceptions of Well-Being: A South African Perspective) found hope to be a stronger predictor of child wellbeing than exposure to community violence.“Our aim is for our music interventions to have a direct impact on the choices that children make for their own lives; to create opportunities for them to access internal and external resources; and to have an impact on their general sense of well-being. We believe that this will lead to a stronger, more resourceful generation of young people who will become contributing members of society. “In South Africa, music therapy is a recognised healthcare profession and music therapists are registered with the Health Professions Council of South Africa. Music therapists must have a masters degree in music therapy. Currently the only training that leads to registration with the HPCSA is through the University of Pretoria’s Music Therapy Unit.“MusicWorks’s intervention is based on music therapy theory and principles and over the past decade we have developed a practice that is adaptable to the various contexts in which we work and sensitive to the specific needs of the beneficiaries in our target communities,” Fouche says.MusicWorks’s innovative programmes have been recognised locally and internationally and in 2010 the organisation received a silver award from the Impumelelo Innovations Trust, as well as the Innovations Award from Mentor International, an organisation founded by the Queen of Sweden. Its programmes have also been featured in several international academic journals and textbooks in the field of music therapy and community music as good-practice examples of community music therapy work.PLAY YOUR PART•Sponsor a child to receive music therapy sessions or to participate in Music for Life groups.•Donate to MusicWorks: regular monthly contributions enable the organisation to budget and plan the logistics necessary to create safe spaces.•Play it Forward concerts are inspired by the film Pay it Forward. A music concert is “passed on” in a chain reaction of goodwill, raising funds and increasing exposure for MusicWorks. Concert formats are diverse – from home concerts to school halls, amateur musicians to professionals, chamber concerts, orchestras and choirs. So if you are a musician, event organiser, interested community member or simply someone who loves music, we invite you to Play it Forward and organise the next concert.•Volunteer: MusicWorks is currently recruiting volunteers for 2015. Check the website http://musicworks.org.za/ for details , or email [email protected], or phone (021) 671 5196(021) 671 5196.* Name has been changed to protect the child’s identity.CallSend SMSAdd to SkypeYou’ll need Skype CreditFree via Skypelast_img read more

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Checking out the IRC world

first_imgA Comprehensive Guide to a Content Audit richard macmanus Guide to Performing Bulk Email Verification Tags:#Social Web#web The Dos and Don’ts of Brand Awareness Videoscenter_img Related Posts I recently downloaded the mIRC client and have been checking out the Freenode IRC network. The few times I’ve logged in there haven’t been many people about – mainly because I live in New Zealand and so my time zone is out of whack with the northern hemisphere. But tonight (Saturday night my time) I had a nice chat with Seb Paquet and Suw Charman on the #kmtalk channel. The other channels I’ve discovered so far are #joiito and #technorati.Seb pointed me to a Topic Exchange wiki page for topics as meeting points, which is something I’m interested in exploring further with the community. e.g. Person-centered versus Topic-centered is something I’ve written about in the past.Even though my time zone and personal schedule prevent a full-on participation in the IRC world, I hope to pop back into #kmtalk and the other tech channels of freenode in the coming weeks. Maybe I’ll see you there! Facebook is Becoming Less Personal and More Pro…last_img read more

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Spouses of CARICOM Heads Visit Historic Falmouth

first_img Spouses of Heads of Government of the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) toured the historic town of Falmouth on Thursday (July 5), where they viewed the 18th century Georgian buildings and participated in craft shopping.The Heads are in Jamaica for the 39th Regular Meeting of the Conference of Heads of Government of CARICOM from July 4 to 6 at the Montego Bay Convention Centre in St. James.The Most Hon. Juliet Holness, wife of Prime Minister and Chairman of CARICOM, the Most Hon. Andrew Holness, hosted the spouses of the leaders from Haiti, Suriname and Belize on a trolley tour.Also on the trip was Mrs. Lis Cuesta Peraza, wife of the President of Cuba, Miguel Díaz-Canel, who is attending the CARICOM meeting as a special guest.Speaking with JIS News, Mrs. Holness said it is very important for the women to see some of the historic sites in Jamaica and to be exposed to the culture and people.“I was particularly pleased.  It was important for them to see the local artisans, bus drivers, taxi drivers, and those persons who are in the food industry contributing to tourism and income generation. It gives them a real taste of Jamaica, its culture and its people,” she noted.Mrs. Kim Simplis Barrow, wife of the Prime Minister of Belize, the Rt. Hon. Dean Oliver Barrow, told JIS News that it was “great to be able to spend some time with Mrs. Holness and the other first ladies that are here”.Mrs. Barrow, who purchased craft pieces from vendors at the Falmouth craft market, said she would like to visit Ocho Rios on her next trip to Jamaica.“Unfortunately, I don’t have much time, but I would really have liked to go to Ocho Rios. One speaks of Ocho Rios as a great attraction in Jamaica. Maybe I will save that for my next visit to Jamaica,” she said.Mrs. Ingrid Bouterse-Waldring, spouse of the President of Suriname, Dési Bouterse, told JIS News that she is enjoying the trip.“Very beautiful; I love authentic things. I like the historic tour. I am enjoying where I am. I am taking back a turtle, which I will put in my office, because I have a lot of colourful things from all places of the world,” she noted.Mayor of Falmouth, Colin Gager, who accompanied the spouses, said he was proud to show off the old town, and the new developments, including the cruise-ship pier and the shopping areas.The group also visited Chukka Good Hope Estate just outside of Falmouth, and the Flankers Community Centre Second Chance Project in St. James. Mrs. Kim Simplis Barrow, wife of the Prime Minister of Belize, the Rt. Hon. Dean Oliver Barrow, told JIS News that it was “great to be able to spend some time with Mrs. Holness and the other first ladies that are here”. The Heads are in Jamaica for the 39th Regular Meeting of the Conference of Heads of Government of CARICOM from July 4 to 6 at the Montego Bay Convention Centre in St. James.  “Very beautiful; I love authentic things. I like the historic tour. I am enjoying where I am. I am taking back a turtle, which I will put in my office, because I have a lot of colourful things from all places of the world,” she noted. Story Highlightslast_img read more

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Shepard Fairey Wants LA Public School Students To Get Creative

first_imgArtist Shepard Fairey is asking Los Angeles public school students to think creatively.Shepard Fairey Invites All LA Students to Collaborate in Third Segment of Los Angeles Fund for Public Education’s Arts Matter Public Art ProjectIn designing the third installment of the Los Angeles Fund for Public Education’s Arts Matter public art project, Fairey will create a design with inspiration from Los Angeles students. The resulting artwork will be displayed on city buses, billboards and other outdoor media throughout the month of July.The request from Fairey, best known for his Obey Giant work and the 2008 “Hope” campaign image of Barack Obama, is being distributed by LAUSD teachers beginning today. Students are asked to “Use your imagination and express yourself,” and tell Fairey, “What the world looks like when you take away the things that limit you.” Students must reply by April 29, via Twitter (using hashtag #artsmatter to @LAFund), email, Facebook or by mail. Fairey will use the responses to inspire his final design.Said Fairey: “Creativity is invaluable in student’s lives because it cultivates problem solving, boosts self-esteem, and promotes communication. Students want to express themselves and find their voices. Art and music are outlets that manifest differently for every individual which provide a perfect antidote for the frustrations of homogeny. Creativity fosters imagination and independence, but builds community at the same time.”“We are thrilled that Shepard Fairey is part of this public art project which calls attention to the critical role arts and creativity should play in our students’ lives. We need our students to be the creative thinkers of tomorrow, so it’s incredible that Shepard Fairey recognizes this as an opportunity to excite and educate our students by asking them to ‘imagine your life without limits,’” said LA Fund CEO Megan Chernin.Next up for LA Fund is supporting school-based arts integration programs for LAUSD. “The Arts Matter campaign has already raised over $865,000 to bring arts integration to LAUSD schools beginning in August 2013. The public support for Arts Matter and LAUSD has been phenomenal. I am certain that our students will provide Shepard Fairey with the inspiration he needs to move our city in a very exciting way,” explained Dr. Steven McCarthy, K-12 Arts Coordinator of LAUSD’s Arts Education Division.The Arts Matter public art project is made possible through the generous donation of outdoor media by CBS Outdoor, Clear Channel and other outdoor media companies. Artist Barbara Kruger created the first project and conceptualist John Baldessari the second, “Learn to Dream/Aprende a Sonar.” Both addressed the essential nature of the arts in developing creative thinking. Donations from the general public, LA Fund board members and corporations such as Mattel, Inc. and Conde Nast also support the Arts Matter public art project and school-based arts integration program.Founded in 2011, the Los Angeles Fund for Public Education is a philanthropic organization dedicated to driving positive change in the Los Angeles Unified School District. The LA Fund partners with LAUSD to invest in innovative, results-oriented programs designed to ensure every student in the nation’s second largest school system has a chance to succeed.For more information on LA Fund go to: www.lafund.org.Source:PR Newswirelast_img read more

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Lack of pipelines cost Canada billions in lost revenue

first_imgCanada is leaving billions of dollars on the table due to a lack of pipeline capacity.Those are the findings of a report from the University of Calgary’s School of Public Policy.The price differential of Western Canadian Select (WCS) relative to West Texas Intermediate (WTI) reflects the lower quality of WCS and transportation costs, but pipeline capacity constraints have dramatically increased the discount to historical levels.Research Associate Kent Fellows said prior to 2013, the WCS/WTI discount generally stayed between nine and 13 per cent of the WTI price but as of February 2, 2018, the differential is at 47 per cent.“The historical differential when we still had some excess capacity was sort of in the range of $10 to $15, maybe a little bit higher than that, but the current one is close to $40 so a pretty big difference,” he said.Fellows explained the larger discount means Alberta is getting lower revenues for each barrel of heavy crude exported, costing the provincial government $6.60 on every barrel of heavy oil exported to the U.S, which is an annual loss of $7.2 billion.Private companies are missing out on $5.3 billion and the federal government is leaving $800 million on the table.Fellows argued this shows why governments need to push for pipelines that are in the public interest.last_img read more

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