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Aritzia to take over Dean & Deluca’s former Soho shop

first_img560 Broadway (Google Maps)Dean & Deluca’s run in Soho came to a dreary end last year when the embattled grocer auctioned off its equipment and shut its doors for good.But now, while many landlords are mired in rent disputes with tenants, the site at GFP Real Estate’s 560 Broadway has found a new tenant.Canadian fashion brand Aritzia — worn by Meghan Markle and popular among Canadian teenagers — has signed a lease to take over the 30,000-square-foot space, according to broker Newmark Knight Frank.Aritzia initially plans to use the space for a “Super Puff” pop-up store, according to Forbes, which first reported the lease. (The name refers to a line of jackets the company is well known for.) A similar concept is in the works for Los Angeles.Founded in 1984, Vancouver-based Aritzia now has more than 95 locations in North America, including a nearby store at 524 Broadway in New York.The retail sector has been under immense strain since the pandemic hit, with stores shuttered across the country, and scores of workers laid off or furloughed. The economic conditions have also led to a string of lawsuits over missed rent payments, and several high-profile bankruptcies.Despite the difficult retail environment, Aritzia is reportedly planning to open up to six new boutiques, aside from the pop ups. In a conference call with analysts this week, the company said the new leases were tied to “compelling post-Covid financial terms,” according to Forbes.Newmark’s Ben Birnbaum, Ariel Schuster and Andrew Taub represented the landlord in the deal. Schuster and Jason Wecker represented the tenant. The landlord did not respond to a request for comment.Read moreSimon Property Group sics the lawyers on deadbeat tenantsRetail condo squeezed by lender as Gap refuses to pay rentTrader Joe’s to open in LIC early next year Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlink Write to Sylvia Varnham O’Regan at [email protected] Share via Shortlink TagsRetail Leasingsoholast_img read more

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Tanzania opens bidding for Rufiji Hydropower project

first_img Finance and Policy Featured image: Stock Previous articleNigeria approves $5bn contract for Mambilla hydropower projectNext articleKenGen: Masinga Power Station needs generator step-up transformer Babalwa BunganeBabalwa Bungane is the content producer for ESI Africa – Clarion Events Africa. Babalwa has been writing for the publication for over five years. She also contributes to sister publications; Smart Energy International and Power Engineering International. Babalwa is a social media enthusiast. Generation AFD and Eskom commit to a competitive electricity sector UNDP China, CCIEE launch report to facilitate low-carbon developmentcenter_img BRICS Low carbon, solar future could increase jobs in the future – SAPVIA Following the declaration to move ahead with the development of the Rufiji Hydropower project at Stiegler’s Gorge, a call for bidders is out. The Tanzanian Ministry of Energy and Minerals has opened the tender process for the construction of the Rufiji Hydropower project, the Citizen reported.The project will see the construction of the largest dam in the country along the Rufiji River in the Selous Game Reserve.According to media, the hydropower project is planned to have an installed capacity of at least 2,100MW with a minimum guaranteed annual supply of 5,920GWh.Rufiji Hydropower projectIn July, the permanent secretary in the natural resources and tourism ministry, Major General Gaudence Milanzi, affirmed the government’s position in the development amid debate against it.Ecologists are opposing the project on grounds that its implementation could damage the World Heritage site. Read more…According to Power Africa, the government of Tanzania is planning to increase the country’s generation capacity up to 10,000MW by 2025 from the current 1,358MW.Plans to construct the dam have been on the government agenda since the 1960’s, Milanzi stated.On Thursday, in the tender invitation, the ministry explained that bidding will be conducted through International Competitive Bidding as specified in the Public Procurement (Amendment) Act, 2016 and the Public Procurement (Goods, Works, Non-Consultants Services and Disposal of Public Assets by Tender) Regulations, 2013.The deadline for submission of bids is at 10:00 hours east African Time on October 16, 2017.Scopes of worksMedia explained that the hydropower project will comprise of construction of the main dam and appurtenant structures with the expected total reservoir storage capacity of 34,000 million cubic.The dam height will be about 134 metres, expected reservoir length is estimated to be 100 kilometres covering an area of about 1,350 square kilometres.In addition to the main dam, there will be saddle dams and cofferdams. The project will also include construction of a power houses to generate the required capacity of 2,100MW and a 400kV switchyard.The construction of the project is expected to be completed in three years. RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORlast_img read more

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Nigeria’s Ikeja Electric commended for embracing technology

first_imgWhile thanking the NERC chairman and his team, Folake Soetan, the chief executive officer of Ikeja Electric reiterated the company’s commitment to the transformation of the power sector, with a focus on creating a superior customer experience. AFD and Eskom commit to a competitive electricity sector Sign up for the ESI Africa newsletter BRICS “You have shown yourself to be a leader and good manager of the industry, making a most profound impact on both industry and customers alike. I have no doubt, therefore, going by technological innovation evolved by your company, that Ikeja Electric is the Disco the industry can depend on for inspiration and ideas to move the power sector forward”, he said. He further congratulated Ikeja Electric for being at the forefront of promoting gender equality in the electricity sector and used the opportunity to restate NERC’s commitment to metering of every electricity user across the country. He commended the chairman for his unwavering belief in the Nigerian polity, noting that the experience and purpose of Prof Momoh have brought a lot of positive changes to the system. TAGSIkeja ElectricNERCNigeria Previous articleFund open for proposals to accelerate off-grid solar in MadagascarNext articleRegenerative tourism project targets 100% renewables status Babalwa BunganeBabalwa Bungane is the content producer for ESI Africa – Clarion Events Africa. Babalwa has been writing for the publication for over five years. She also contributes to sister publications; Smart Energy International and Power Engineering International. Babalwa is a social media enthusiast. RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Generation Kola Adesina, chairman of Ikeja Electric, in his response, thanked Prof Momoh and his entourage for the visit to Ikeja Electric, especially as it coincides with the 7th anniversary of privatisation. Low carbon, solar future could increase jobs in the future – SAPVIA The chairman of the Nigerian Electricity Regulatory Commission (NERC), Prof James Momoh has commended Ikeja Electric, Nigeria’s largest Electricity Distribution Company (Disco), for taking the lead in keeping pace with technology, to bring about the desired change in the power sector. Read more about:NERCIkeja Electric He called on the Disco to create knowledge management initiatives that incorporate institutions of higher learning, in order to create a pool which will sustain the technological advancement recorded so far in the industry. Prof Momoh, who gave the commendation during an oversight visit to the corporate head office of Ikeja Electric in Lagos, noted that Ikeja Electric has shown a strong commitment to solving issues militating against the growth of the sector through technology while also providing innovative solutions to create a better customer experience. Finance and Policy Featured image: Stock UNDP China, CCIEE launch report to facilitate low-carbon developmentlast_img read more

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School baseball coach, wife electrocuted to death repairing hurricane damage on field

first_imgMattGush/iStock(BRISTOL, Fla.) — A high school baseball coach and his wife were electrocuted to death on the field in Florida while trying to repair hurricane damage, authorities said.Liberty County High School’s head baseball coach, Corey Crum, was operating a boom lift and unloading equipment from a trailer at the school’s baseball field in Bristol, west of Tallahassee, when the lift struck power lines overhead on Sunday afternoon.Crum, 39, was electrocuted, and then his 41-year-old wife, Shana, was electrocuted trying to help him, according to the Liberty County Sheriff’s Office.The couple died at the scene.Their 14-year-old son was also shocked by the electrified lift while trying to help his parents but is expected to survive. He was taken to a local hospital for treatment of his injuries, according to the sheriff’s office.Several members of the school’s baseball team, their parents and community volunteers were on the baseball field at the time to help Crum with repairs.The field was heavily damaged when Hurricane Michael, a historic Category 4 storm, slammed into the Florida Panhandle last October, killing dozens of people.The students were taken to the school gym after the incident, where grief counselors were made available, according to the sheriff’s office.Representatives for Liberty County High School and the encompassing Liberty County School District did not immediately respond to ABC News’ requests for comment Tuesday morning.“This is a tragic event which has rocked our community to its core,” Liberty County Sheriff Eddie Joe White said in a statement Monday.Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Coronavirus updates: US records more than 1,000 new deaths from COVID-19

first_imgnarvikk/iStockBy MORGAN WINSOR, ABC News(NEW YORK) — A pandemic of the novel coronavirus has now killed more than 741,000 people worldwide.Over 20 million people across the globe have been diagnosed with COVID-19, the disease caused by the new respiratory virus, according to data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University. The actual numbers are believed to be much higher due to testing shortages, many unreported cases and suspicions that some national governments are hiding or downplaying the scope of their outbreaks. Since the first cases were detected in China in December, the United States has become the worst-affected country, with more than five million diagnosed cases and at least 164,537 deaths. Here’s how the news is developing Wednesday. All times Eastern:8:01 a.m.: Russia’s COVID-19 case count tops 900,000Russia reported 5,102 new cases of COVID-19 over the past 24 hours, bringing its tally soaring past 900,000. The country also reported an additional 129 fatalities. The nationwide total now stands at 902,701 confirmed cases with 15,260 deaths, according to data released Wednesday morning by Russia’s coronavirus response headquarters. Russia’s latest daily caseload is down from a peak of 11,656 new infections reported on May 11.Russia has the fourth-highest highest number of diagnosed COVID-19 cases in the world, behind the United States, Brazil and India, according to a count kept by Johns Hopkins University. Russian President Vladimir Putin announced Tuesday that his country has become the first in the world to grant regulatory approval to a COVID-19 vaccine. Critics say the vaccine was approved before the final Phase III trial and that no scientific data from the early trials has been released so far.7:16 a.m.: Over 1,000 students in Georgia school district under quarantineMore than 1,000 students in a single Georgia school district have been ordered to self-quarantine this month after at least 70 cases of COVID-19 were confirmed in various schools. The Cherokee County School District has published data on its website showing at least 1,130 students and 38 staff members from more than a dozen schools are under mandated two-week quarantines. The district reopened its schools on Aug. 3, welcoming back 30,000 students for in-person learning.Many of the confirmed cases were identified at Etowah High School in Woodstock, Georgia. The Cherokee County School District announced Tuesday that it is temporarily closing Etowah High School, with the hope of resuming in-person classes there on Aug. 31. “This decision was not made lightly,” the school district said in a statement Tuesday. “As of this morning, the number of positive cases at the school had increased to a total of 14, with tests for another 15 students pending; and, as a result of the confirmed cases, 294 students and staff are under quarantine and, should the pending tests prove positive, that total would increase dramatically.”6:33 a.m.: First dog to test positive for COVID-19 in North Carolina diesThe first dog to test positive for COVID-19 in North Carolina has died, officials said.The dog, who had been showing signs of respiratory distress, was brought to the NC State Veterinary Hospital on the evening of Aug. 3, after the owner noticed the onset of distress earlier in the day, according to a press release from the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services.The dog ultimately succumbed to the “acute illness,” and its owner alerted veterinary staff that a member of the family had previously tested positive for the novel coronavirus but later tested negative.Samples were collected from the dog and sent to the National Veterinary Services Laboratories, which confirmed a positive test result for COVID-19. The dog’s family, along with state health officials, were notified.“A necropsy was performed to try to determine the animal’s state of health at the time of death and the cause of death, and the complete investigation is ongoing,” the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services said in a statement Tuesday.There is currently no evidence that pets play a significant role in spreading COVID-19, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as well as the United States Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.5:20 a.m.: Two men facing charges for allegedly hosting house party in NashvilleTwo men are facing criminal charges for violating public health emergency orders by allegedly throwing a large party at their house in Nashville, Tennessee earlier this month.The Metropolitan Nashville Police Department has issued arrest warrants for Christopher Eubank, 40, and Jeffrey Mathews, 36, who were both reported to be out of state Tuesday night and have been told to surrender upon returning to Nashville. Eubank and Mathews are each charged with three separate counts — all misdemeanors — of violating health orders by hosting a gathering in excess of 25 people, not requiring social distancing and not requiring face coverings.Police said hundreds of people attended the Aug. 1 party at the property owned by Eubank and Mathews, located on Fern Avenue in Tennessee’s capital. Patrol officers responded to the home late that night and ultimately directed that the party cease.Cellphone footage, obtained by Nashville ABC affiliate WKRN-TV, purportedly shows large crowds of people at the party wearing no masks and not maintaining social distancing. 4:39 a.m.: Nearly one-third of Kentucky’s new cases among teensNearly one-third of new COVID-19 cases in Kentucky at the end of July were among those 19 years old or younger, according to an internal memo from the Federal Emergency Management Agency obtained by ABC News Tuesday night.In Mississippi, Black residents represented 58.5% of the state’s new cases during the period from July 5 through Aug. 1 — a 37.2% difference between cases and census racial distribution, according to the FEMA memo.Meanwhile, the test-positivity rate was greater than 10% last week in Arkansas, where 5,593 additional cases were reported and two counties have emerged as new hotspots. Logan County reported 90 new cases last week, an increase of 428% and a test-positivity rate of 17.59%. Poinsett County reported 74 new cases, an increase of 189% and a test-positivity rate of 15.43%, according to the FEMA memo.However, the national test-positivity rate continues to decline. Over the past seven days, the rate was 6.6% — down from 7.9% from the previous week. The nation also saw a 12.7% decrease in new cases as well as a 4.3% decrease in new deaths being confirmed over the last week, compared with the previous seven-day period, according to the FEMA memo.The memo shows that just five states and territories are in an upward trajectory of new cases, while two states are at a plateau and 49 states are going down.3:45 a.m.: US records more than 1,000 new deaths from COVID-19There were 46,808 new cases of COVID-19 identified in the United States on Tuesday, according to a count kept by Johns Hopkins University.An additional 1,082 coronavirus-related deaths were also reported — more than double the amount from the previous day.Still, it’s the third consecutive day that the nation has recorded less than 50,000 new cases. Tuesday’s caseload is also well below the record set on July 16, when more than 77,000 new cases were identified in a 24-hour reporting period.A total of 5,141,208 people in the U.S. have been diagnosed with COVID-19 since the pandemic began, and at least 164,537 of them have died, according to Johns Hopkins. The cases include people from all 50 U.S. states, Washington, D.C. and other U.S. territories as well as repatriated citizens.By May 20, all U.S. states had begun lifting stay-at-home orders and other restrictions put in place to curb the spread of the novel coronavirus. The day-to-day increase in the country’s cases then hovered around 20,000 for a couple of weeks before shooting back up and crossing 70,000 for the first time in mid-July.Many states have seen a rise in infections in recent weeks, with some — including Arizona, California and Florida — reporting daily records. However, the nationwide number of new cases and deaths in the last week have both decreased in week-over-week comparisons, according to an internal memo from the Federal Emergency Management Agency obtained by ABC News Tuesday night. Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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DHS official warns taking down social media accounts could hurt intel gathering

first_imgGwengoat/iStockBy LUKE BARR and ALEXANDER MALLIN, ABC News(WASHINGTON) — As social media companies mount an unprecedented crackdown in the wake of last week’s attack on the U.S. Capitol — deleting the accounts and posts of users they say are pushing rhetoric that could drive individuals to violence — a Department of Homeland Security official has told ABC News there is new concern that such dramatic action could hurt efforts to gather intelligence on certain extremist groups.“The pro, obviously is, you’re removing that content from that and that ability for people to coordinate on these public platforms like Parler or Twitter or Facebook,” a DHS official who requested anonymity, said. “But the con is that you’re driving those folks that are intent on committing violence into more encrypted channels which limit the government’s ability to track those.”This official added that just because accounts are taken down from a platform doesn’t mean people will stop communicating and coordinating their efforts.In some cases, law enforcement officials have already social media posts against those who allegedly took place in last Wednesday’s assault.“They’re just going to do it in a way where we have less visibility. And certainly, I think from our perspective that just and we’re already dealing with a needle in a haystack,” this official said, adding that when folks switch to an encrypted channel they lose visibility on them.State homeland security officials echo the concern that the reduction in the social media presence for some radical elements may make them more difficult to track.This official also said that it “wouldn’t be surprising” to see attacks directed at places that aren’t state capitals, adding that they see this threat lasting beyond the issues driving the current threats.Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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RESEARCH TECHNICIAN

first_imgA875100-SCHOOL OF VET MEDICINE/SURGICAL SCIENCES Minimum $32,697 ANNUAL (12 months)Depending on Qualifications Position Summary: Official Title: Lori [email protected] Access (WTRS): 7-1-1 (out-of-state: TTY: 800.947.3529, STS:800.833.7637) and above Phone number (See RELAY_SERVICE for furtherinformation. ) Institutional Statement on Diversity: Applications Open: Apr 7 2021 Central Daylight TimeApplications Close: May 1 2021 11:55 PM Central DaylightTime Department(s): Diversity is a source of strength, creativity, and innovation forUW-Madison. We value the contributions of each person and respectthe profound ways their identity, culture, background, experience,status, abilities, and opinion enrich the university community. Wecommit ourselves to the pursuit of excellence in teaching,research, outreach, and diversity as inextricably linkedgoals.The University of Wisconsin-Madison fulfills its public mission bycreating a welcoming and inclusive community for people from everybackground – people who as students, faculty, and staff serveWisconsin and the world.For more information on diversity and inclusion on campus, pleasevisit: Diversity andInclusion Job no: 232992-ASWork type: Staff-Full TimeDepartment: VET M/SURGICAL SCIENCESLocation: MadisonCategories: Research, Scientific Work Type: Ongoing/Renewable Job Number: Minimum Years and Type of Relevant Work Experience: Full Time: 100% Position Duties: The research enterprise in the Department of Surgical Sciencesincludes both clinical and basic science research bymultidisciplinary research groups. This is a position withinComparative Orthopaedic and Genetics Research Laboratory, for whichthere are two Principal Investigators. The Comparative Orthopaedicand Genetics Research Laboratory is located in the School ofVeterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison. Researchwithin the laboratory is focused on studies of spontaneous diseasesin companion animals as models for human disease. Outside of theSchool, the laboratory has a long history of strong collaborativerelationships with investigators in the School of Medicine, theCollege of Engineering, the College of Agriculture and LifeSciences, and data science researchers in several departmentsacross campus, as well as collaborations with other institutionsand corporate entities.center_img Salary: BS or BA required. Preferably in animal science, biology, molecularbiology, cell biology, genetics, biomedical engineering. Employment Class: Contact: Appointment Type, Duration: To apply for the position, please click on “Apply Online” to beginthe application process. You will be required to upload a coverletter, current CV, and a document listing the contact informationfor three professional references. For questions regarding theapplication process, please contact Lori Chamberlain([email protected]).Questions about the position can be directed to: Dr. SusannahSample ([email protected]) or Dr. Peter Muir([email protected]). The University of Wisconsin-Madison is engaged in a Title and TotalCompensation (TTC) Project to redesign job titles and compensationstructures. As a result of the TTC project, official job titles oncurrent job postings may change. Job duties and responsibilitieswill remain the same. For more information please visit: https://hr.wisc.edu/title-and-total-compensation-study/.Employment will require a criminal background check. It will alsorequire you and your references to answer questions regardingsexual violence and sexual harassment.The University of Wisconsin System will not reveal the identitiesof applicants who request confidentiality in writing, except thatthe identity of the successful candidate will be released. See Wis.Stat. sec. 19.36(7).The Annual Security and FireSafety Report contains current campus safety and disciplinarypolicies, crime statistics for the previous 3 calendar years, andon-campus student housing fire safety policies and fire statisticsfor the previous 3 calendar years. UW-Madison will provide a papercopy upon request; please contact the University of Wisconsin PoliceDepartment . SR RESEARCH SPEC(T16BN) or RESEARCH SPECIALIST(T16DN) or ASSOCRESEARCH SPEC(T16FN) Instructions to Applicants: Academic Staff-Renewable 232992-AS Degree and Area of Specialization: List of Duties The University of Wisconsin is an Equal Opportunity andAffirmative Action Employer. We promote excellence throughdiversity and encourage all qualified individuals to apply.If you need to request an accommodation because of a disability,you can find information about how to make a request at thefollowing website: https://employeedisabilities.wisc.edu/disability-accommodation-information-for-applicants/ Previous laboratory experience needed. Experience in one or more ofthe following areas is preferred:Experience with molecular biology, DNA and RNA isolation, PCR,RT-PCR, ELISA, western blottingExperience with immunohistochemistryExperience with histopathology and electron microscopyExperience with experimental animal handlinglast_img read more

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S19 permits ‘cannot be used’ if money changes hands

first_img‘Non-commercial’ means not being paid money, says TC Rooney, as he accepts surrender of Section 19 permits and grants Newcastle company a national licenceSection 19 permits cannot be used legally if money changes hands.Though the Section 19 legislation is complex, the situation itself is clear. The EU legislation requires that a PSV O-Licence is held if passengers are carried for payment, whether or not a profit is made. There is a misconception that “non-commercial” means not making a profit, when in fact it means not being paid money.This was made plain by Traffic Commissioner (TC) Kevin Rooney at a Leeds Public Inquiry (routeONE, News, 1 June), when he heard an application by Alan Borthwick for six additional permits in the name of Tynemouth Community Transport and accepted the surrender of his existing six permits.He revoked the two-vehicle restricted licence held by Sean Campbell, trading as Campbell Minibus Hire, because of the use of one of Mr Borthwick’s permits and a change of entity into a limited company, but granted an application for a five-vehicle national licence by the company.Initially Mr Campbell, trading as Campbell Mini Bus Hire, of Yew Tree Gardens, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, and the company’s application came before Deputy Traffic Commissioner (DTC) Gillian Elkins. Mr Campbell told the DTC that he had been a full-time taxi driver and he successfully operated under the restricted licence. He was advised by his accountant that for tax purposes he should form a limited company.The company was incorporated in 2010 and he was the sole shareholder and director. He had not realised that that meant there was a change of entity. He had subcontracted a school contract with Newcastle City Council to Tynemouth Community Transport (TCT) using a Section 19 permit. The DTC said enquiries revealed that TCT Ltd had been dissolved on 21 October 2014. That raised more questions over the S19 permit, as any permits that company had would have died with the company.In reply to the DTC, Mr Campbell said that he had sub-contracted to TCT as he did not have a licence disc to put on the vehicle. Mr Borthwick approached him to obtain a contract from Newcastle City Council in about 2012.He agreed that the supposed operation under the permit in 2015 was unacceptable. He was never told that TCT had been dissolved. He had been paying Mr Borthwick for the use of the permit.Adjourning the proceedings, the DTC said that she was giving Mr Campbell an opportunity of providing further evidence about the permit arrangement. She would like to see a copy of the permit and copies of the contracts. Investigation would be made into what was going on with Mr Borthwick, who held a sole trader licence (routeONE, Court Report, 10 February).When the case came before TC Rooney, he was also considering the six S19 permits held by Mr Borthwick, together with his application for an additional six S19 permits.For Mr Campbell and the company, John Reid said that following the last hearing Mr Borthwick was contacted, who said that he had never been a director or shareholder of a limited company and that he ran TCT on a voluntary basis.Mr Borthwick said that he had always been a sole trader. He had his own restricted PSV O-Licence and two hackney carriage licences, doing private hire and taxi work. He had previously done community work with his restricted licence until the drivers’ hours rules were changed. That was when he applied for Section 19 permits.After Mr Borthwick said that he believed ‘non-commercial’ meant not making a profit, the TC said that that was the problem. If money was changing hands it was a commercial activityTCT did not own any vehicles and they hired vehicles from operators like Mr Campbell. He did not make any money out of the community work. He did not advertise it or have a web site. Mr Campbell had used the vehicle with the permit on the school contract and that had saved TCT from having to pay for the hire of the vehicle.He had spoken to the fraud squad about being named as a Director of an insolvent company, Tyneside Community Transport Ltd. The person who set up that company had then removed his name and substituted a similar name to his. The matter was still under investigation.After Mr Borthwick had said that he believed that “non-commercial” meant not making a profit, the TC said that that was the problem. If money was changing hands it was a commercial activity and the EC drivers’ hours rules applied. If passengers were being carried for payment, then an O-Licence was required.After a brief adjournment, the TC allowed Mr Borthwick to withdraw his application for the permits.last_img read more

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Police reports

first_imgFollowing are some of the incidents reported to the Harvard University Police Department (HUPD) for the week ending Sept. 22. The official log is located at 1033 Massachusetts Ave., sixth floor, and is available online at http://www.hupd.harvard.edu.Sept. 18: Officers were dispatched to Holyoke Center and 60 John F. Kennedy St. on reports of unwanted guests. Officers were dispatched to the Littauer Center to take a report of suspicious activity. An iPod Touch was reported stolen from an unattended backpack in Thayer Hall North. At the Palfrey House, an officer assisted the Cambridge Police Department (CPD) with a motor vehicle that was reportedly broken into. Forty medical vials were reported stolen from the Armenise Building 1. Officers were dispatched to Lehman Hall, where an individual’s stolen bicycle was located, but secured with a different lock. The officers assisted in the return of the bicycle. Police responded to a report of two unwanted guests at the Science Center. The officers spoke to the individuals and after finding no warrants, the individuals were sent on their way. At Quincy House, officers were dispatched to a report of a suspicious individual. The suspect was searched, and upon finding a weapon in his possession, the officers placed him under arrest and charged him with trespassing and possession of a dangerous weapon. At the intersection of DeWolfe and Mill streets, officers responded to a report of an individual jumping on motor vehicles. CPD was notified and took over upon arrival.Sept. 19: An individual was arrested for trespassing at the Taubman Center after officers discovered that he was previously warned. At Emerson Hall, an unattended blue Brooks Brothers blazer was reportedly stolen. Officers were dispatched to the stadium, where a fight was reported to be in progress. After speaking with the individuals, the officers sent them on their way.Sept. 20: Officers responded to a report of an individual attempting to enter the Longwood Campus Operations building. After speaking with the officers, the individual was sent on their way. At Lowell House, officers removed a group of individuals from the walkway. An officer assisted CPD with a motor vehicle accident on 1 Eliot St. At 285 Harvard St., an officer took a report of fraudulent charges on a credit card. An officer was dispatched to take a report of harassment at Peabody Terrace.Sept. 21: Officers were dispatched to a report of an individual screaming. The officers searched the area with negative results. At Hamilton Hall, officers responded to a report of an individual receiving harassing phone calls. On 371 Harvard St., an officer assisted CPD in putting out a working fire.Sept. 22: At the Peabody Terrace garage, police took a report of a stolen car stereo, subwoofers, and tires. An unattended toaster was reported stolen from Baker Library. In Harkness Commons, an unwanted guest was sent on their way. At 1000 Memorial Drive an officer assisted the Massachusetts State Police with a disabled vehicle. At Morgan Hall, an officer was dispatched to take a report after a mountain bicycle damaged a parking gate. A trespass warning for all of Harvard University property was issued to three individuals who were behaving suspiciously at Westengard House. The individuals were then sent on their way.Since Sept. 18, there have been six bicycles reported stolen.last_img read more

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Ambulance Dedicated to Fallen EMT

first_imgPennsylvania EMS department blesses and dedicates ambulance to fallen EMT.last_img

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