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How Trump’s tax plan would affect Alaskans

first_imgEconomy | Federal Government | Juneau | SouthcentralHow Trump’s tax plan would affect AlaskansOctober 2, 2017 by Liz Ruskin, Alaska Public Media Share:(Creative Commons photo by Ken Teegardin)If President Trump’s tax agenda goes into effect, taxes for people of all income groups would go down next year, on average. But only a few Alaskans would get the big tax breaks.According to a preliminary analysis by the non-partisan Tax Policy Center, most of the total tax benefit in 2027 would go to the top 1 percent — people making more than $730,000 a year. On average, they would save more than $100,000 a year in taxes in 2018, the report said. But you won’t find many of the nation’s 1-percenters in the far north.Economist Mouhcine Guettabi at the University of Alaska said the state has a fairly equal distribution of income, compared to other places.“We only have about 15,000 returns or so every year that have more than $200,000 in them,” Guettabi said.That’s fewer than 5 percent of Alaska taxpayers claiming income of more than $200,000, according to IRS data. And, at the other end of the scale, Guettabi said Alaska’s poor aren’t all that poor, thanks in part to the Alaska Permanent Fund dividend.“That means there’s a lot of people in the middle,” Guettabi said. “And so if indeed a lot of the changes are going to negatively impact middle class Americans, then that means that there’s a larger percentage of Alaskans that are going to feel it.”The Tax Policy Center said most households in the income range of $50,000 to $150,000 would see their taxes stay the same or drop modestly, though about one in three would see an increase.The White House and Republican leaders in Congress unveiled their tax proposal last week. Some vital information wasn’t included, like the income levels for the tax brackets. The Tax Policy Center said it filled in some of the gaps with information from previous Republican proposals. Critics charge the think-tank’s report is based on faulty assumptions.One thing the Republican proposal would explicitly do is eliminate deductions, such as municipal real estate taxes. Some 70,000 Alaskan property owners use that deduction to lower their federal tax bill.Frank Sammartino, a senior fellow at the Tax Policy Center, said eliminating that deduction would have some effect in Alaska.“Although the percentage claiming the deduction, and the average deduction that people claim, is much lower than in most states,” Sammartino said.The vast majority of Alaskans don’t itemize. They take the standard deduction, which the Republican plan would double.Republicans in Congress are expected to spend the next several weeks working on their budget proposal, to set the stage for their tax legislation.But the tax plan is already having one effect in Alaska: It undercuts one of the selling points for Gov. Bill Walker’s proposed payroll tax. If Congress passes the Republican tax plan, a statewide levy like the one Walker wants would no longer be an IRS deductible.Share this story:last_img read more

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Review: Bolshoi Ballet’s “Black Swan”

first_imgUncategorizedReview: Bolshoi Ballet’s “Black Swan”By Leilah Bernstein – June 8, 2012491ShareEmailFacebookTwitterPinterestReddItThe story of a tragic bird packed the house at the Music Center last night. (And no, it wasn’t because of California’s upcoming ban on foie gras.) The crowd poured into the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion to see a remarkable, finely executed production of Swan Lake by the Bolshoi Ballet. The company performs here through Sunday.Call it Black Swan mania. Call it Benjamin Millepied fever (the film’s choreographer debuts his L.A. Dance Project at Disney Hall in September). Whatever it is, this 2001 ballet conceived by Yuri Grigorovich—and based on the 19th-century version by Marius Petipa, Lev Ivanov, and Alexander Gorsky—is the ballet of the moment. Classical Russian technique, elaborate sets and costumes, a love story gone awry: The performance had all the right elements, and I found tears streaming down my face as the dancers took their final bows. It’s that moving.Anna Nikulina, in the lead role of Odette (the white swan) and Odile (the black swan), carried the production on opening night. She gave a flawless performance, from tilting and shaking her head like a graceful feathered fowl to powering through the famous series of fouettés that have long defined Act 2. Semyon Chudin’s turn as Prince Siegfried was more disappointing. His leaps were grand, his spins were seamless, but something seemed lackluster, as if he didn’t fully own the stage. More memorable were the swan formations—a gorgeous feat of symmetry and unity. The solo of the Four Swans, who interlock their arms and perform in a perfect line, was particularly impressive.You could hear Russian rolling off the tongue as the audience made their exit. Then in English you could hear words like “fabulous,” “breathtaking,” and “pretty amazing.” The Bolshoi, which was founded in 1776, still proves to be one of the greatest ballet companies in the world. What a treat to see them here. Just bring some Kleenex.[Photo by Damir Yusupov] TAGSL.A. Culture2012June 2012Previous articleLila Downs Headlines New Season at LuckmanNext articleA Special, The-End-Really-is-Near Edition of the Friday Afternoon Cram, 6/8/12Leilah Bernstein RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORFollow in Pee-wee Herman’s Footsteps Across L.A.What Defines a Successful Immigrant?The Undocumented Immigrants Who Are Redefining ‘American’last_img read more

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Iain Duncan Smith says David Cameron will not serve full second term

first_img Show Comments ▼ Joe Hall whatsapp whatsapp Iain Duncan Smith says David Cameron will not serve full second term center_img Iain Duncan Smith has claimed David Cameron will not serve a full second term as Prime Minister if elected, contradicting Cameron’s own statements last week.Cameron said he wanted to “finish the job” in a second term but ruled out the possibility of a third term. However work and pensions secretary Duncan Smith veered from the Party line in an interview on the BBC’s Andrew Marr Show on Sunday, admitting that there would have to be a Conservative leadership contest before the 2020 election.When asked if Cameron would have to step aside during a second term to make way for a leadership contest the former Tory leader said: “Yes that’s right, he does.” Duncan Smith said:Of course there will be a competition at some point, but that will be a competition on the back of a successful Prime Minister doing something that most Prime Ministers have never done before: saying ‘I know when it’s time to go.You’ve had to literally rap the knuckles of people like Gordon Brown and previous prime ministers to get them to think of going, but he’s [Cameron] actually very keen to say ‘there is a limit, there’s an amount of time a prime minister should serve before they get stale’ And he is right about that.The senior cabinet minister added that Cameron set a date for his departure and he would be “sorry to see him go”, praising him for his record on the economy.In his own interview with the BBC last week, Cameron said his party had “some great people coming up” and alluded to Theresa May, George Osborne and Boris Johnson as potential replacements.However, Duncan Smith shied away from endorsing the suggested names, saying: “Having been leader of a party that was interested in having a fight in an empty room in those days but now has changed and wants to have power, I have given up making predictions about who should be doing what.” Share Sunday 29 March 2015 1:35 pm Tags: David Cameron General Election 2015 Iain Duncan Smith Peoplelast_img read more

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Bonita Springs woman remembers husband of 58 years who died of COVID-19

first_imgCOVID-19 restrictions likely kept kids out of swim class, putting them at risk June 9, 2021 Health Matters: Managing the Stress of COVID-19 June 7, 2021 RELATEDTOPICS Advertisement AdvertisementRecommended ArticlesBrie Larson Reportedly Replacing Robert Downey Jr. As The Face Of The MCURead more81 commentsGal Gadot Reportedly Being Recast As Wonder Woman For The FlashRead more29 comments AdvertisementTags: Bonita SpringsCovid-19 AdvertisementNBC2 sat down with his widow who described Bob as her soulmate. She said it started with what she thought was a cold. Bob’s symptoms worsened and he collapsed in their home.When she called 911 the day he collapsed and watched as paramedics took her husband away, she had no idea that would be the last time she’d see him leave their home alive.“Friday night, before he went on the ventilator, he called me, he called my sons, he called my olden son and told him where everything was, so he must have had a premonition,” Farina said. “My reaction was, ‘this can’t be happening.’” Mobile pediatric clinic provides COVID vaccines for children 12+ June 15, 2021 LEE COUNTY, Fla. — There’s no doubt that the coronavirus has changed our society forever.But now, with three vaccines on the market, there is hope.For one Bonita Springs woman, giving up is not an option. Diane Farina lost her husband of 58 years to COVID-19. Bob Farina passed away on December 14, 2020. AdvertisementDC Young Fly knocks out heckler (video) – Rolling OutRead more6 comments’Mortal Kombat’ Exceeded Expectations Says WarnerMedia ExecutiveRead more2 commentsDo You Remember Bob’s Big Boy?Read more1 commentsKISS Front Man Paul Stanley Reveals This Is The End Of KISS As A Touring Band, For RealRead more1 comments Florida Department of Health will no longer release daily COVID-19 data June 8, 2021 Advertisement Today, Farina has turned her focus to securing a COVID-19 vaccine. “After what happened with my husband it was terrifying to me to think that I could also be taken to the hospital and my kids would have no clue,” she said. “I’m very anxious about getting that shot.”Like so many others, Farina is trying everything she can to get a vaccine. She is still encouraging everyone to take every COVID-19 precaution.last_img read more

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Financial literacy a concern even for the well-educated: study

first_img How to connect with your clients’ kids Related news Keywords Financial literacy The Canadian results also showed demographic patterns that are similar to what has been found in other countries, the paper notes, in that young respondents, older respondents, women, minorities, and those with less schooling tend to score worse. “It is also lower in Quebec and Atlantic provinces and, in particular, low among those speaking French in Quebec. However, these differences seem mostly due to differences in educational attainment among regions and language groups,” it notes. Even so, the report indicates that relatively well-educated Canadians don’t score that well. “Financial literacy increases with education, but even among those with high levels of education, for example college-educated respondents, only 60% could answer all three questions correctly,” it says. Moreover, the paper says that this lack of financial literacy should be important to the ongoing policy debate over retirement savings reform in Canada. “Retirement planning is strongly associated with financial literacy. This result has been found in many countries and the estimates in Canada are similar to those of other countries,” it says. “This is relevant in the Canadian context because of the relatively low level of financial literacy, even among the more fortunate Canadians (i.e., those with higher education and income), who may need to rely more and more on voluntary savings programs to fund their accustomed level of consumption in retirement,” it concludes. James Langton Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Report reveals Canadians’ weak knowledge of retirement income Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Even well-educated Canadians demonstrate relatively low levels of financial literacy, according to a new paper published by the U.S. National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER). The paper from a trio of academics — David Boisclair, Annamaria Lusardi, and Pierre-Carl Michaud — finds that only about 42% of respondents to a survey could correctly answer three simple questions about the fundamental financial concepts of compounding, inflation, and diversification. This is more or less in line with the findings of similar surveys in other countries, it notes. For example, while Canadians score somewhat better than Americans, they come off worse than Germans, in answering these kinds of basic questions, the paper notes. Intuit and Highline Beta launch fintech acceleratorlast_img read more

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More effort needed to improve disclosure for retail investors

first_img Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Related news Keywords DisclosureCompanies Investment Industry Regulatory Organization of Canada James Langton CSA sets rules on non-GAAP financial reporting “More effort needs to be focused on ensuring that disclosures directed towards retail clients in particular are relevant, concise, written in plain language and delivered at a point in time when they can have the most impact,” she said. And, to do that, she suggested that regulators will have to get tougher about what they require from the industry. “To achieve these goals will likely require that regulators be more prescriptive than has been the case historically, as regards to the form, content and delivery of retail-focused disclosure in order to ensure consistency of approach and comparability across market participants,” she said. Wolburgh Jenah also said that, while efforts to improve financial literacy and enhance investor education “are important complementary strategies”, they cannot be expected to eliminate the information asymmetry between investors and the industry. “They will ‘narrow the gap’ and help investors to be more confident and aware of the questions they should be asking,” she said; adding, “A more confident, aware investor is a better protected investor.” At the same time, Wolburgh Jenah also said that boosting industry proficiency standards, and continuing education requirements, “should be a core regulatory strategy across all licensing categories and all sectors of the financial services industry.” She also suggested that regulators should become more aggressive in ensuring that new investment products serve a useful purpose, rather than just ensuring that they meet disclosure requirements. “When market participants seek to introduce new market innovations or investment products, it is appropriate to ask them to identify their target audience and how they are expected to benefit from the innovation,” she said. “The goal should not be to stifle innovation but to encourage market participants and intermediaries to also be thinking about these issues from a broader market integrity perspective,” she concluded.center_img Regulators propose slimming corporate disclosure Regulators will have to get tougher to ensure effective disclosure, and adequate protection, for retail investors, suggested Susan Wolburgh Jenah in her final speech as head of the Investment Industry Regulatory Organization of Canada (IIROC) Speaking at the Rotman Capital Markets Institute’s Discussion on Disclosure in Toronto on Tuesday, Wolburgh Jenah, who is due to end her time as IIROC’s first president and CEO on Oct. 31, noted that disclosure needs to improve its efficacy where retail investors are concerned. Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Don’t believe the hype: BCSC proposes new rules for stock promoterslast_img read more

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Region must Settle Trade Arrangements in Time for CSME – Owen Arthur

first_imgRegion must Settle Trade Arrangements in Time for CSME – Owen Arthur UncategorizedFebruary 5, 2007 RelatedRegion must Settle Trade Arrangements in Time for CSME – Owen Arthur RelatedRegion must Settle Trade Arrangements in Time for CSME – Owen Arthur Advertisementscenter_img RelatedRegion must Settle Trade Arrangements in Time for CSME – Owen Arthur FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Prime Minister of Barbados, Owen Arthur, has said that the region must come to a decision regarding arrangements with its traditional economic allies and trading partners, before the full implementation of the Caribbean Single Market and Economy (CSME) in 2008.“We have to put in place a new relationship with Europe beginning the first of January 2008. Our relationship with the United States of America is in a position of uncertainty,” he said, adding that the region’s relationship with the global economy, through its participation in the World Trade Organization (WTO), would also have to be clearly defined by next year.“The Caribbean cannot ask the rest of the world to stop and let us get off. We have to, on our own part and on our own initiative, define how we want to participate with the rest of the world,” Prime Minister Arthur said, as he addressed the joint meeting of the CARICOM Prime Ministerial sub-committee on external trade negotiations and the CARICOM Single Market and Economy (CSME) today (Feb. 5) at the Ritz Carlton Hotel in Montego Bay.The Barbadian Prime Minister, who along with Prime Minister Portia Simpson Miller are co-chairs of the two-day meeting, said that the joint committee would be considering a paper, which sets out a holistic vision as to how the region should be developed, and the framework that should be adopted for the CSME.Meanwhile, Mrs. Simpson Miller, in her address, noted that the conference would provide a practical demonstration of the “capacity and flexibility of the institutional structures to adapt in the effort to achieve a common regional goal”.She noted that the meeting had one agenda, which was to identify the best way to achieve and sustain progress for the Caribbean people.“We are a small region of small countries, blessed with people of great ambitions and big hearts. Our people have always recognized the need to embrace the wider world to our advantage. In order to do that, we need to have shared goals,” she stated.According to Mrs. Simpson Miller, the sub-committee on external negotiations had a responsibility to ensure that the region had the most receptive and fair international environment in which to implement its shared vision and to compete.“It is the access to and the effective use of our collective resources, which will make us internationally competitive as a region,” she stated.CARICOM Secretary General, Edwin Carrington, in his address, noted that the joint meeting was a “visionary initiative most worthy of endorsement and support by all sectors and stakeholders within the Caribbean community”. The two-day conference will consider a report emanating from a meeting of the Caribbean Council for Trade and Economic Development (COTED) and the CARIFORUM ministerial meeting on strategic issues in external negotiations, which took place on the weekend, among other single market and regional integration issues.last_img read more

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Nikki to help drive Gunnedah Shire tourism

first_imgNikki to help drive Gunnedah Shire tourism Gunnedah Shire CouncilExperienced tourism manager Nikki Robertson has joined the Gunnedah Shire Council team to help bring Gunnedah to the rest of the world.As one of her first tasks in the role, Nikki has been invited to speak about Agritourism and the pilot project between the Liverpool Plains and the Office of the Small Business Commissioner at the Local Government Destination and Visitor Economy Conference this week.Nikki brings a lot of experience to the role. Before taking up her appointment as Gunnedah Shire’s Tourism Team Leader, she managed the Liverpool Plains Visitor Information Centre for eight years, helping build the Liverpool Plains as a destination, including the success story of sunflower tourism.“This is a fresh challenge,” Nikki says. “I can put to use everything I have learnt in the Liverpool Plains and expand it.“Gunnedah has huge potential in tourism, particularly during this time when people are looking to holiday within Australia, and we have new attractions including the Dorothea Mackellar silo and the Rainbow Serpent.“I am really passionate about tourism. I have travelled all over Australia, I love the country, and we have got so much to share here. I want the world to come and visit Gunnedah.”Nikki was born in Switzerland, she has now lived in for over 26 years and is happy to call this area home.Caption: Nikki Robertson has joined the Gunnedah Shire Council team and Tourism Team Leader. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Australia, business, Commissioner, conference, Economy, Government, Gunnedah, Gunnedah Shire Council, Holiday, liverpool, local council, Local Government, project, Rainbow, Robertson, Small Business, Switzerland, tourismlast_img read more

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BP Center For Visualization Unveils Multi-Million Dollar Environment

first_imgShare Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail Published: Oct. 29, 2001 State and University of Colorado officials along with several major industry sponsors today unveiled a multi-million-dollar visualization center that offers advanced immersive visualization capabilities for a variety of business sectors, as well as opportunities for scientists to better understand the natural environment. The advanced, three-dimensional “virtual” environment already has saved the oil and gas industry millions of dollars in exploration and development costs. It allows engineers and geoscientists to collaborate more efficiently, and to more accurately comprehend complex geologic formations than would be possible with traditional tools. The Immersive Visualization Environment (IVE) is the crown jewel of the new BP Center for Visualization at the University of Colorado at Boulder, made possible through a $10.6 million gift from BP last fall and augmented by additional gifts of more than $2 million. The gift established the interdisciplinary research center in the College of Engineering and Applied Science, co-sponsored by the College of Arts and Sciences, and also will provide “satellite” visualization environments at CU’s Center for Human Simulation at Fitzsimons, and at the new Discovery Learning Center in CU-Boulder’s College of Engineering. “We are excited about the creation of the state-of-the-art visualization center at the University of Colorado and about the positive effects it will have on CU, this state and the region for many years to come,” said CU President Elizabeth Hoffman. “The BP Center for Visualization will greatly enhance CU’s commitment to technological innovation and reflects the university’s dedication to excellence in research, teaching and technology,” she said. “I want to thank our industry sponsors — BP, Landmark Graphics, SGI, Lockheed Martin and Paradigm Geophysical — for partnering with us in the development of this important new technology.” Colorado Secretary of Technology Marc Holtzman added: “This partnership aligns perfectly with the Governor’s vision to bring the efforts of academia and private industry together. BP’s generous contribution will enable the University of Colorado to expose students to cutting-edge technologies and will serve as a catalyst to encourage students to pursue degrees in advanced technology disciplines.” The main IVE in Boulder consists of a 12 x 12 x 10-foot screened space, into which high-powered computerized images are projected, allowing scientists and engineers to interact with a natural or artificial environment by viewing it close up and from different angles. The system tracks the location of users and allows them to alter the position of the images as they interact with the environment. The technology offers opportunities to better understand atmospheric and geologic conditions, reconstruct archeological sites, simulate aviation and even explore the inside of the human body. Additional applications include design testing for manufacturers and architectural and urban planning. According to Tony Meggs, BP’s group vice president for technology: “The BP Center will expand the use of immersive visualization technology beyond the traditional applications in the energy industry to new areas such as weather forecasting, human health, aerospace and agriculture. CU and the State of Colorado are uniquely positioned with a blend of academic skills and institutions, high technology and aerospace companies, and telecommunications to make the most of the BP Center for Visualization.” John Gibson, president and CEO of Landmark Graphics, said the center “provides an opportunity for the top professionals from many different industries to share in the exciting innovations taking place in the oil and gas industry. Landmark invented and marketed the world’s first 3D seismic processing solution in 1982, and we know that the technology can offer critical insights to anyone trying to make sense of complex data in a visual way,” Gibson said. “From finding oil and clean burning gas in the most environmentally sensitive way, to discovering clean water, hidden contamination sources or helping to design more fuel efficient vehicles and buildings, this center will have applications that will help us all see the future in a very new and exciting way.”CU-Boulder BP Center for VisualizationFACT SHEETThe BP Center for Visualization is a new, interdisciplinary research center at the University of Colorado at Boulder, established through a $10.6 million gift from BP (formerly British Petroleum) announced in October 2000.Based in the College of Engineering and Applied Science, and co-sponsored by the College of Arts and Sciences, the center spent the last year renovating a 7,800-square-foot facility on the East Campus, at 3400 Marine St., to house its reconfigurable Immersive Visualization Environment (IVE). ARCO developed the visualization technology for use in oil and gas exploration. Subsequent to its acquisition of ARCO in April 2000, BP donated the visualization equipment, intellectual property and some operating revenue to the university. Geoffrey Dorn, the center’s executive director, came to CU-Boulder with several other members of BP’s visualization research team.Other major sponsors of the center are Landmark Graphics, SGI, Lockheed Martin and Paradigm Geophysical. The center is co-hosted by the departments of computer science and aerospace engineering sciences in the College of Engineering and Applied Science, and the department of geological sciences in the College of Arts and Sciences.The BP gift also provided a smaller Immersive Visualization Environment to be installed at the CU School of Medicine in the Center for Human Simulation. A workbench-size system also will be set up in the new Discovery Learning Center being constructed by the College of Engineering and Applied Science at CU-Boulder.The mission of the BP Center for Visualization includes:* Conducting basic research in visualization technology;* Developing and enhancing the application of visualization technology to a range of disciplines;* Educating undergraduate and graduate students in visualization technology and applications;* Commercialization of both donated and newly developed intellectual property to help sustain the research and development program.The visualization industry involves 5,500 people worldwide, 59 percent of them in North America and 28 percent in Europe. The size of the market is projected to be $37 billion in 2001, which represents more than 50 percent growth in annual revenue over 2000. There are already an estimated 40,000 users of visualization technology on six continents, primarily in the areas of energy exploration, medical training and virtual prototyping for manufacturing. Potential growth areas include aviation simulation, telecommunications, architectural and urban planning, military operations and training, archeological site reconstruction, atmospheric science and the entertainment industry.Web site: http://www.colorado.edu/Research/bpVisCenterPhone: (303) 735-0127last_img read more

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Coal mine dust hastens Arctic snow melt

first_imgShare Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail Published: Feb. 1, 2017 • By Trent Knoss Dust released by an active coal mine in Svalbard, Norway, reduced the spectral reflectance of nearby snow and ice by up to 84 percent, according to new University of Colorado Boulder-led research.Collecting spectral reflectance measurements of surface snow with corresponding snow samples in Northern Svalbard. Photo Credit: Alia Khan / University of Colorado BoulderThe study illustrates the significant, localized role that dark-colored particulates—which absorb more solar radiation than light-colored snow and keep more heat closer to the Earth’s surface—can play in hastening Arctic ice melt.   The study was published today in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, a publication of the American Geophysical Union.Unblemished snow and ice have a very high spectral albedo, a measurement used to indicate how effectively a given surface reflects solar energy. Over time, airborne black carbon particles (from soot or automobile emissions, for example) or other mineral dust can travel long distances in the atmosphere and settle on snow and glaciers, lowering the overall albedo.To study the localized effects of coal dust on an area with high spectral reflectance, CU Boulder researchers focused on an active coal mine in Svalbard, Norway, located on a sparsely populated island north of the Arctic Circle. The researchers collected snow and ice samples from four sites at varying distances from the mine, with some samples being visibly dirtier than others.The researchers then measured the light absorption capacity of each sample, adjusting for environmental factors such as snow grain size and location relative to the mine. Overall, the study concluded that coal dust had a strong but localized effect, reducing the albedo in the immediate area by up to 84 percent.The findings may provide a foundation for similar research using satellites and remote sensing techniques in far-flung areas.“The extreme contrast between snow and dust at this particular site gave us a baseline to develop algorithms that we can now use to take future measurements in areas that aren’t easily accessible,” said lead study author Alia Khan, a post-doctoral researcher in CU Boulder’s National Snow and Ice Data Center and former graduate student at the Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research (INSTAAR).Collecting spectral reflectance measurements of surface snow with corresponding snow samples next to Mine 7 near Longyearbyen, Svalbard. Photo Credit: Alia Khan / University of Colorado BoulderThe findings may also provide context for future policymaking decisions regarding the potential expansion of mining the coal-rich Arctic region, especially in light of ongoing permafrost thaw that may allow more land-based drilling operations. “We hope these ground-based spectral measurements could be used in the management of future energy development in the Arctic, especially for mines that may be unavailable for ground-based observations, but may be large enough to be visible by satellite,” Khan said.Co-authors of the new research include Diane McKnight of INSTAAR and CU Boulder’s Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Heidi Dierssen and Adam Chlus of the University of Connecticut; Joshua Schwarz of NOAA; Carl Schmitt of the National Center for Atmospheric Research; Mark Hermanson of the University Center of Svalbard; and Thomas Painter of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and California Institute of Technology.The research was supported by the National Science Foundation; NASA Ocean Biology and Biogeochemistry and the Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrological Sciences; and the University Center in Svalbard.Categories:EnvironmentNews Headlineslast_img read more

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